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Sawblades


#1

I have a few questions for anyone out there about jeweler’s
sawblades. I just about only use 8/0. I would be interested in
finding some smaller. Does anyone know if they are available
anywhere?

Also, I have used Herkules Black Lable for years. What is the
difference between their black and white lables?

Does anyone have another favorite kind and why?

Thanks, Mary


#2
  I have a few questions for anyone out there about jeweler's
sawblades.  I just about only use 8/0.  I would be interested
in finding some smaller.  Does anyone know if they are
available anywhere? 

I have not seen any smaller than 8/0. I’ve never used any
smaller than 3/0. Yet, I just read that one should use smaller
sizes for thinner gauges.

I don’t know about the difference between black or white . . .
I’ve used yellow.


#3

Mary,

I just bought some blades from Frei & Borel (their own brand)
and they are THE nicest blades that I have ever used. I haven’t
done alot of comparing, but have used a number of different
brands, and these seem to be much more flexible, forgiving, and
quick cutting than any others that I have used. Their smallest
size is, however, 8/0.

Karen
karen@carvedbyramsey.com


#4

Although this isn’t a reponse to the tiny sawblade question, it
is related. After 20 years with the same saw frame it was finally
time to replace it. Since I do this full time I thought I’d pop
for the more expensive model. I bought a Swedish made unit from
Rio with a cushy looking handle, aluminum frame, and little holes
to slip in the blade with plastic coated thumb screws to tighten.
Beautiful, but would not hold the blade and belive me I really
cranked the screws. Dissapointed that my beautiful saw frame
would not preform one of its required duties (hold the blade), I
returned it. I then ordered a fifty dolar, wooden handled, one
peice unit with little slots that are not supposed to allow any
movement of the blade whatsoever. This very plain looking frame
is great, I have very little blade breakage and total control.
Bought it at Gesswein.

Mark P.


#5
time to replace it. Since I do this full time I thought I'd pop
for the more expensive model. I bought a Swedish made unit from
Rio with a cushy looking handle, aluminum frame, and little holes
to slip in the blade with plastic coated thumb screws to tighten.
Beautiful, but would not hold the blade and belive me I really
cranked the screws. Dissapointed that my beautiful saw frame

Mark: I have one of those Swedish saw frames and love it. If you
read the directions that came with it, assuming its the same
brand, it says NOT to crank down on the thumb screws and it only
takes a light turn to hold the blade. I have several sawframes
and this is the one I always end up using, it holds the blade
true…Dave

Kickass Websites for the Corporate World http://www.kickassdesign.com
Crystalguy Jewelry http://www.opendoor.com/stephensdesign/crystalguy.html
Recumbent Cyclist’s Advocacy Group
http://www.opendoor.com/stephensdesign/bent/rcag.html


#6
   Mark: I have one of those Swedish saw frames and love it.
If you read the directions that came with it, assuming its the
same brand, it says NOT to crank down on the thumb screws and
it only takes a light turn to hold the blade. I have several
sawframes and this is the one I always end up using, it holds
the blade true 

hi dave,

i bought one of them space age sawframes and read the
instructions. it worked at first and i was very pleased. now it
doesn’t hold the sawblade very well. (i read the instructions
and bet mark did too.) like mark, i’m working all the time and
don’t have time to fiddle around with reinserting sawblades.
whatever mechanism they use to hold the blade is too finicky for
me, but the rest of the design is great, very light. i’m not
going to send it back just yet. i would like to take it apart
and see what kind of fastening stuff is inside and modify it to
a less tempermental design.

best regards,

geo fox


#7

Dave,

Mine must have been defective then. Because it really wouldn’t
hold the blade, soft touch or otherwise. My appologies to you and
your favorite sawframe.

Mark


#8

Wow, Mary! 8/0? I almost always default to 4/0 as my general
all-around saw blade! I don’t even know if I have any finer
blades! I don’t recall ever thinking I could have/should have
used a finer blade. I’m curious about your reasoning for using
such a fine blade? It seems the sawing task would take a lot
longer with an 8/0. Maybe for some really detailed piercing…

As for brand… I couldn’t tell you what I’m using (one of the
"better" brands from Rio), but I suspect good sawing skills make
more of a difference than brand when it comes to sawblade
longevity. I have to admit being intrigued by the catalog photo
of the blade bent in a full circle, though!

Please let me know why you like the 8/0 so much!

Dave Sebaste
Sebaste Studio
Charlotte, NC (USA)
dave@sebaste.com
http://www.sebaste.com


#9

Liked your coments on saw blades. We have been using 4/0 blades
for nearly all out work, and have done so for over 25 years.
Have tried other sizes , but always come back to the 4/0. We
use the Rio blades also, (Gold) anad have found them
satisfactory. We keep some 8/0 blades to use on special
projects that require an extra fine cut(seperate prongs that are
very fine. When I have a lot of breakage it’s usually my fault
for trying to push them or not lubeing them.Fred


#10

I think 4/0 blades are the best all-purpose size, although I
keep some 0s around for ripping through heavy sheet.

However, for those intricate pierced patterns, with no clean-up,
8/0 are the only way to go! It’s only slightly worse than sawing
with hair!

Karen


#11

Mark: I took the Swiss saw apart to see why it holds better and
why overtightening it would be bad. Basically (mine’s a Grobet)
its two bolts that tighten to their flat ends together. If you
overtighten it you will gounge the blade into the flat end of the
other bolt and then it wouldn’t hold well nor stay true. You
could probably easily fix it by sanding the bolt ends flat
again. My German standard saw frames just tighten two pieces of
steel together and they’re not perfectly flat. Cheap saw blades
in my German frames frequently refuse to saw in a straight line
while the Swiss frame will handle them. Unfortunately the Swiss
frame comes only in one size that I’ve seen…Dave

Kickass Websites for the Corporate World http://www.kickassdesign.com
Crystalguy Jewelry http://www.opendoor.com/stephensdesign/crystalguy.html
Recumbent Cyclist’s Advocacy Group
http://www.opendoor.com/stephensdesign/bent/rcag.html


#12

Dave -

You wanted the reason I like to use the 8/0 sawblades…

I am twining(a basketry process much like weaving)gold wires
into a tube(for rings) or into small shapes, and then need to saw
into the structure to fabricate my pieces. I am currently using
24 gauge warp and 32 gauge weft. A larger sawblade will really
grab those 32 gauge wires and pull things apart.

Peter Rowe has told me the difference between black and white
lable Herkules - the while lable is for die cutters - is really
hard, but really brittle. I appreciate this as I will never
again buy white lable for a school situation where students are
learning to saw on non-ferrous. They have enough trouble with
blades breaking. I should investigate some of the other brands
of blades - I am too much a creature of habbit and just keep
using what I grew up on.

Mary


#13
 Peter Rowe has told me the difference between black and white
lable Herkules - the while lable is for die cutters - is
really hard, but really brittle.  I appreciate this as I will
never again buy white lable for a school situation where
students are learning to saw on non-ferrous.  They have enough
trouble with blades breaking.  I should investigate some of the
other brands of blades - I am too much a creature of habbit and
just keep using what I grew up on. 

Mary, Have you heard anything about “Yellow?” I’ve only see
white and Yellow, I don’t know which (or if either) is better.


#14

Hi Mary, and thanks for your response! I knew you did wire and
weaving work (I’ve seen your beautiful work for years), and as I
was composing my question, I couldn’t visualize how 8/0 was
important in that situation. I was just thinking of cutting
individual (standalone) wire. With your description, I clearly
understand! Thanks for taking the time to help me “put it all
together” in my head!

Thanks, also, for passing on Peter’s tip about white vs. black!

Dave

Dave Sebaste
Sebaste Studio
Charlotte, NC (USA)
dave@sebaste.com
http://www.sebaste.com


#15

Fishbre -

No, I have never used the yellow lable Herkules blades, sorry.

Mary


#16

Hi, I’m Gini and a friend of Bernice Davis. She and I went to
see your show at the Albertson-Peterson Gallery in Winter Park!!
Fantastic work!! I was familiar with your work but was thrilled
to see it in person. As a former weaver, I can really appreciate
the technique you are using. Keep it up!! Gini


#17

hi mary,

i’m another who’ve admired your work very much for a long time,
so i feel very presuming in telling you this because i’m sure
you know it already. i just can’t help myself. when i have to
saw thru mesh or delicate wire, i put the whole thing in
shellac, pitch or engravers cement (easier to clean off) backed
by wood or brass and saw it that way. i know you know this, but
now i feel better.

best regards.

geo fox


#18

George -

Many thanks for the kind words and the reply. I have enjoyed
your contributions to this forum. I am so thankful that there
are individuals like you who have learned much in our trade
through doing much and who are so willing to share. I spend a
lot of my time as an educator, and studied from people who did
the same. As has been discussed, this has certain advantages
along with some disadvantages… I am learning LOTS from you
all, thanks.

The process I have been using to cut through my woven mesh is
actually just to load on a lot of flux(white paste type from
Superior), glass it out, let it air cool and cut through that.
It usually holds well enough if I am careful.

Mary


#19

Greetings Orchidites- You can also try using hot glue, like the
guns they sell at Wal-mart for $7-8. It holds all but the
smallest things, and all you have to do after you’ve finished is
put the article under the steam for a minute or so, and it will
release whatever it’s holding. I engrave a lot of chain slides
and this is how I hold them without putting marks on the
pieces.Also, when setting emeralds which you can destroy trying
to get the piece out of shellac or ruin trying to melt the
shellac to get it out, the hot glue is wonderful. You only have
to steam it and it comes loose- no problem for the emeralds. You
may have to slightly warm the pieces before putting in the glue
to get a better bond sometime though, but usually on smaller
pieces. I use shellac occasionally, but mostly the hot glue these
days!(and I think that it is perfectly safe) Regards-Ricky Low,
Jeweler and Hand Engraver, Houston, Texas,USA (713)-974-3710