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Sandblasting


#1

Hi, all.

I’d like to set up a sandblaster in my shop for jewelry metal
texturing, and make an appeal to those who have experience with such
machinery for tips, hints, clues, wisdom – all those things I see daily on
this board – in helping to get set up. My main problem is space, so I’d
appreciate ideas on making everything compact.

  1. What is the minimum size compressor that’s effective?

  2. What sort of work enclosure is best?

  3. What kinds of media and equipment (brand names) have you found
    effective?

I’ll probably be working mainly with small pieces of karat gold,
Sterling and perhaps platinum – as well as cleaning rust from my jewelry
tools (just moved from a beach location).

Also, for our Master Model Maker, or anyone else, has anyone
experimented with sandblasted textures on Ferris hard wax? It may be a
really dumb idea, and there may be better ways to achieve interesting
textures without embedding sand or silicon carbide in your wax model. But
I’ve worked with lots of it and, with the right medium, it just might
work…all ideas welcome.

Thanks in advance,

Rick Martin
MARTIN DESIGNS


#2

Richard O. Martin wrote:

    Hi, all.
    I'd like to set up a sandblaster in my shop for jewelry metal

texturing, and make an appeal to those who have experience with such
machinery for tips, hints, clues, wisdom – all those things I see daily on
this board – in helping to get set up. My main problem is space, so I’d
appreciate ideas on making everything compact.

    1.  What is the minimum size compressor that's effective?
    2.  What sort of work enclosure is best?
    3.  What kinds of media and equipment (brand names) have you found

effective?

    I'll probably be working mainly with small pieces of karat gold,

Sterling and perhaps platinum – as well as cleaning rust from my jewelry
tools (just moved from a beach location).

    Also, for our Master Model Maker, or anyone else, has anyone

experimented with sandblasted textures on Ferris hard wax? It may be a
really dumb idea, and there may be better ways to achieve interesting
textures without embedding sand or silicon carbide in your wax model. But
I’ve worked with lots of it and, with the right medium, it just might
work…all ideas welcome.

    Thanks in advance,
    Rick Martin
    MARTIN DESIGNS

i have not tried sand blasting wax yet. you will need an air compresser
that can easily hold 40 lbs. pressure, cost about 400$. after you get
one we will talk about mediums.


#3

Richard O. Martin wrote:
Hi Rick, it sounds like a small hand held unit (my personal favorite)
might be right for you. Having a glass top enclosure (that attaches to a
vacuum cleaner) helps to contain the grit. I’ll dig out my catalog later
and get descriptions for you, if you want…

Jeffrey

    Hi, all.
    I'd like to set up a sandblaster in my shop for jewelry metal

texturing, and make an appeal to those who have experience with such
machinery for tips, hints, clues, wisdom – all those things I see daily on
this board – in helping to get set up. My main problem is space, so I’d
appreciate ideas on making everything compact.

    1.  What is the minimum size compressor that's effective?
    2.  What sort of work enclosure is best?
    3.  What kinds of media and equipment (brand names) have you found

effective?

    I'll probably be working mainly with small pieces of karat gold,

Sterling and perhaps platinum – as well as cleaning rust from my jewelry
tools (just moved from a beach location).

    Also, for our Master Model Maker, or anyone else, has anyone

experimented with sandblasted textures on Ferris hard wax? It may be a
really dumb idea, and there may be better ways to achieve interesting
textures without embedding sand or silicon carbide in your wax model. But
I’ve worked with lots of it and, with the right medium, it just might
work…all ideas welcome.

    Thanks in advance,
    Rick Martin
    MARTIN DESIGNS
         Jeffrey Everett

Handmade 18K, 22K, and platinum gemstone fine jewelry.
Diamond setting, rubber/metal molds, casting, lapidary
Die and mold engraving, plastic patterns for casting.
Cad jewelry design, cad/cam milling scroll filigree…
P O Box 2057 Fairfield IA 52556 515-469-6250


#4

Jeffrey Everett wrote:

Hi Rick, it sounds like a small hand held unit (my personal favorite)
might be right for you. Having a glass top enclosure (that attaches to a
vacuum cleaner) helps to contain the grit. I’ll dig out my catalog later
and get descriptions for you, if you want…

Jeffrey

I’d really appreciate more on your set-up, Jeffrey. What sort
of compressor do you use?

Rick


#5

Mr. Richard O. Martin:

I bought the best model the jewelry industry catalogs, I would gladly
sell it to you. But I would rather save someone the time and money
through my experiences.
Save your self a lot of money an buy outside the regular jewelry
industry, I learned from experience. Find a MATCO TOOL Distributor (they
visit Car Dealers)They have a real nice unit Model CBS10E, then order
the fine abrasive from the regular jewelry Distr. You can beat their
service and warranties. I buy colbalt drill bits when and if they break
they give me new ones N/C.


#6

M.G. wrote:

i have not tried sand blasting wax yet. you will need an air compresser
that can easily hold 40 lbs. pressure, cost about 400$. after you get
one we will talk about mediums.

M.G.: I’ve found a compact Central Pneumatic 1 3/4-gallon oilless
compressor with a 1 1/2 h.p. motor rated at 116 psi for $170. It’s rated at
5.2 cfm at 40 psi and 4.6 cfm at 90 psi. It seems to me that a small tank
should supply the pressure needed for small jewelry jobs – but I’m seeking
input from those who’ve worked with these systems day in and day out. Maybe
a larger tank is needed for some reason, although I’d think that most small
jobs should go pretty quickly so that pressure from a small tank should
remain fairly constant. I’ve also located a 3/4 hp 100 psi tankless
compressor for just $105. Why wouldn’t it work? Any and all input appreciated.

Rick


#7

Richard O. Martin wrote:

big snip

where is your message??? all that was here was Richards original!

John Dach and Cynthia Thomas
Maiden Metals
a div. of Open your heart and let the sun shine in.
MidLife Crisis Enterprises
PO BX 44
Philo, CA 95466
707-895-2635(phone/fax)


#8

Hi one and all,

I am new to this list as of yesterday (4 nov). Got this list source from
an ArtMetals list (blacksmiths, casters, fabricators, jewelers and anybody
else working in metal and the arts). I am an art bronze caster and Cynthia
is a jeweler, master model maker, sculptur and student (MFCC/Art Thearpy).
That is for the bio. Glad to have found this list and be here.

Rick,

   snip
   1.  What is the minimum size compressor that's effective?

this question will be dictated when you find the unit that you
like/want/need/are going to get.

   2.  What sort of work enclosure is best?

Complete with a vacuum air removal/filtration system. Gets dusty (removing
investment) and just the media blowing around inhibits visual if you don’t
have a vacuum. If you do not need to look at what you are working on then
a power vacuum is a bit less necessary but the exausting blast air still
needs to get filteres as it gets out of the enclosure.

   3.  What kinds of media and equipment (brand names) have you found

effective?

I would suggest glass beeds rather than sand (or any other sharp material)
as the beads do not remove any metal…the sand will. I do not know of
any jewelry units, but I got a 3’x4’ 'clamshell unit from Harbor Freight
for under a grand. you definately do not need this large of a unit (unless
you do custom work for Jack’s Giant or something) but HF does have smaller
units. If it does not come with a vacuum unit get a small shopvac and hook
it into the blast box. And if you do this, be sure to add some sort of
"air valve" (joles in the box with a plastic?? reed/flap valve, so when you
are not blasting, air can still get into the box to supply the vacuum.
Also the vacuum will most likely have a higher cfm than the blaster, so
this extra air will help clean out the dust cloud. This is sounding like
more than you might want, but I venture to say if you go this route you
will find all sorts of uses and wonder how you ever got by without it
before.

   I'll probably be working mainly with small pieces of karat gold,

Sterling and perhaps platinum – as well as cleaning rust from my jewelry
tools (just moved from a beach location).

works great for rust (the beads). Don’t use sand or you will remove a lot
of metal.

   Also, for our Master Model Maker, or anyone else, has anyone

experimented with sandblasted textures on Ferris hard wax? It may be a
really dumb idea, and there may be better ways to achieve interesting
textures without embedding sand or silicon carbide in your wax model. But
I’ve worked with lots of it and, with the right medium, it just might
work…all ideas welcome.

Cynthia has used Farris wax for years but we have never tried blasting it.
It might not work too well as the plastic filler in the wax may have enough
give so the blasting material gant bit into it. Sand might work better
here rather than the beads. I do not think that embedding media would be
much of a problem in the farris wax. softer waxes yes. Even if it does
occur, still might be an interesting added “effect”.

Hope this is of help. When Cynthia and I need equipment, we usually get
the best that is available for our needs. I don’t use the blast cabinate 8
hours a day 7 days a week so we figured we didn’t need a $5-10,000 heavy
duty, industrial cabinate, but we needed a big one for the sculptures. I
guess I am saying that get the best for your needs, but this doesn’t always
mean the most expensive.

For a first post to a list this is really a bit much, but I hope sombody
might get something from my experience/thoughts/ideas.

John

PS Just noticed Jefferies note about hand helt units. Post or Harbor
Frieght sell a hand gun/syphon unit for about $20.00 ($10.00 on sale).
Work great but difficult to contain the media and thus it is lost and it
gets all over you. I use one all the time for certain cercumstances, but
then everone calls me Sandy that day.

John Dach and Cynthia Thomas
Maiden Metals
a div. of Open your heart and let the sun shine in.
MidLife Crisis Enterprises
PO BX 44
Philo, CA 95466
707-895-2635(phone/fax)


#9

Jeffrey Everett wrote:

Richard O. Martin wrote:
Hi Rick, it sounds like a small hand held unit (my personal favorite)
might be right for you. Having a glass top enclosure (that attaches to a
vacuum cleaner) helps to contain the grit. I’ll dig out my catalog later
and get descriptions for you, if you want…

Jeffrey

    Hi, all.
    I'd like to set up a sandblaster in my shop for jewelry metal

texturing, and make an appeal to those who have experience with such
machinery for tips, hints, clues, wisdom – all those things I see daily on
this board – in helping to get set up. My main problem is space, so I’d
appreciate ideas on making everything compact.

    1.  What is the minimum size compressor that's effective?
    2.  What sort of work enclosure is best?
    3.  What kinds of media and equipment (brand names) have you found

effective?

    I'll probably be working mainly with small pieces of karat gold,

Sterling and perhaps platinum – as well as cleaning rust from my jewelry
tools (just moved from a beach location).

    Also, for our Master Model Maker, or anyone else, has anyone

experimented with sandblasted textures on Ferris hard wax? It may be a
really dumb idea, and there may be better ways to achieve interesting
textures without embedding sand or silicon carbide in your wax model. But
I’ve worked with lots of it and, with the right medium, it just might
work…all ideas welcome.

    Thanks in advance,
    Rick Martin
    MARTIN DESIGNS
             Jeffrey Everett

Handmade 18K, 22K, and platinum gemstone fine jewelry.
Diamond setting, rubber/metal molds, casting, lapidary
Die and mold engraving, plastic patterns for casting.
Cad jewelry design, cad/cam milling scroll filigree…
P O Box 2057 Fairfield IA 52556 515-469-6250

orchid@ganoksin.com

Good bead blasters can often be gotten as second hand from automobile
rebuilding shops that are closing or up for auction.They are used to
clean parts and most shops have one or two.This will be a bit large
perhaps for your needs but you may find that they are less expensive
than the ones made specifically for the jewelry industry.I found a small
blasting cabinet at a flea market for $4 …not pretty but hey it
works…It is also possible to build your own cabinet and you really
don’t need fancy dust removal equipment if you intend to blast one or
two items at a time a vacuum (shop type) works fine…G


#10

Richard O. Martin wrote:

M.G. wrote:

i have not tried sand blasting wax yet. you will need an air compresser
that can easily hold 40 lbs. pressure, cost about 400$. after you get
one we will talk about mediums.

M.G.: I’ve found a compact Central Pneumatic 1 3/4-gallon oilless
compressor with a 1 1/2 h.p. motor rated at 116 psi for $170. It’s rated at
5.2 cfm at 40 psi and 4.6 cfm at 90 psi. It seems to me that a small tank
should supply the pressure needed for small jewelry jobs – but I’m seeking
input from those who’ve worked with these systems day in and day out. Maybe
a larger tank is needed for some reason, although I’d think that most small
jobs should go pretty quickly so that pressure from a small tank should
remain fairly constant. I’ve also located a 3/4 hp 100 psi tankless
compressor for just $105. Why wouldn’t it work? Any and all input appreciated.

Rick

the only tankless compresssors i’ve come across can not put out enough
pressure to do a good job, by that I mean can delilver good steady
pressure for mass production. i have used a hand held type tho for
etching small patterns on some older designs. it was an air brush.


#11

John & Cynthia/ MidLife Crisis Ent. wrote:


#12

Richard, I have done a bit of low end sandblasting. The biggest problem
is containing the dust which can be very hazardous to your health. I use
a 2 1/2 HP compressor, but you can get by with a smaller one if your air
delivery system has a large holding tank which is drawn on intermittently.
For jewelry you do not need a big system (unless you are doing large
production runs or deep etching).

I was reading the jewelry newsgroup online yesterday. There is a post
regarding a $100 unit from Harbor Freight which might be of interest to
you. If you would like I can forward it to you.

Marlin


#13
    Rick Martin
    MARTIN DESIGNS

i have not tried sand blasting wax yet. you will need an air compresser
that can easily hold 40 lbs. pressure, cost about 400$. after you get
one we will talk about mediums.

Ouch, $400! I used to do photo retouching using an air brush and used a C02
tank and regulator, I wonder if that might be cheaper in the long run , but
what psi do the sandblasters work off of? Airbrushes use about 20lbs psi
and a 20lb tank of C02 lasts quite awhile…whole rig would cost about
$150. Air compressors are nice too but C02 was much cheaper and didn’t get
moisture in the line…Dave

Art Jewelry for Conscious People
http://www.opendoor.com/stephensdesign/crystalguy.html


#14

I’d really appreciate more on your set-up, Jeffrey. What sort
of compressor do you use?

Rick

I have a typical 4 hp 20 gallon tank compressor. It cost me about $400.
You might be able to find one used, I did for my first one, got me by
until I could get a bigger one… But then again, I need the 125 psi
for my plastic injector. The hand held sand blasters work best around
60-70 psi. Lately, I’ve seen some 3 hp compressors on sale for about
$200, they must be imported…

         Jeffrey Everett

Handmade 18K, 22K, and platinum gemstone fine jewelry.
Diamond setting, rubber/metal molds, casting, lapidary
Die and mold engraving, plastic patterns for casting.
Cad jewelry design, cad/cam milling scroll filigree…
P O Box 2057 Fairfield IA 52556 515-469-6250


#15

Welcome,

Want to try bronze casting… book rec??

Jim

At 10:28 AM 11/5/96 +0200, you wrote:


#16

At 11:23 AM 11/6/96 -0500, you wrote:

Welcome,

Want to try bronze casting… book rec??

Jim

Jim,

Lordy, you’ve got your fingers into as many different projects as I do!
Gonna try to take a forging class this spring…

Susan

C Gems
Original Designs and Period Jewelry
cgems@pipeline.com


#17

Well,

There is a bronze casting place in Orlando and I want to stop by one of
these days for a look see… My idea is that it takes lost of space, huge
ovens etc… so really just browsing!!!

Jim

At 12:54 PM 11/6/96 -0500, you wrote:


#18

Welcome,

Want to try bronze casting… book rec??

Jim

"aiork…all ideas welcome.

Jim,

There is not too much out there. Ron Young co authored a book on bronze
casting. I can’t remember the title but it has sculpture and bronze in the
title. If you can’t find it lrt mr know and I will get the info down in
the foundry. If I can be of service to you and explain some burning
questions please feel free to post to the list or directly. I am happy to
help anyone.

John

John Dach and Cynthia Thomas
Maiden Metals
a div. of We are given eyes to see and ears to hear,
MidLife Crisis Enterprises but what is required of the mind?
PO BX 44
Philo, CA 95466
707-895-2635(phone/fax)


#19

Well,

There is a bronze casting place in Orlando and I want to stop by one of
these days for a look see… My idea is that it takes lost of space, huge
ovens etc… so really just browsing!!!

Jim

Not really. I have a pretty complete foundry, poured 370-380 lbs in 1 1/2
days, 85 lb crucible capacity, in a 1 car garage with a leanto over the
kilns (either of which I can carry away myself) which will take a 3’ tall
piece without extension rings. It does take some equip. and materials but
it is not outrageous. My foundry is open to anyone who would like to see
it,use it (fee based of course). Primarilt ceramic shell but also some oil
sand and playing with resin bonded sand. Looking into cast steel/iron too.

John

John Dach and Cynthia Thomas
Maiden Metals
a div. of We are given eyes to see and ears to hear,
MidLife Crisis Enterprises but what is required of the mind?
PO BX 44
Philo, CA 95466
707-895-2635(phone/fax)


#20

John: So then…your Subject: Sandblasting above… you meant to say
Sand Casting (in bronze)? :wink: