Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

Safety Using Power Rolling Mills


#1

Twas not to long ago that there was a thread on powered rolling mills
and I have recent experience of what can result from not being as
careful as one should be.

I was cleaning my mill and opened the rollers so I could clean the
bottom roller with sandpaper with the mill on.

Not being careful enough to make sure the rollers were open enough
that so my fingers could not get caught, as I moved the sandpaper
back and forth, the rollers grabbed my left index and middle fingers.
Fortunately the mill has a clutch and the rollers stopped at the
first joint. The damage was a small fracture on the index finger and
ten stitches for each finger to repair the damage from being
crushed. No tendon damage.

Quite humbled by this experience, I am grateful that I will not lose
any parts. 35 years of relatively minor injuries, and then a big
lesson like this.

This happened Tuesday the 13th. I was actually working the next day,
thanks to oxycodone.

I have been slowed down considerably but I am determined to work to
recover as much use of both fingers as I can. I have been able to
solder, saw,file, make rubber molds, cut them open and shoot waxes,
(and delegate what I cannot do to employees).

I knew I was lucky to have used as many jewelry and lapidary tools
over the years and not have injured myself seriously. Now at 61 I
need to be as careful as I can so I keep what I have left intact.

Richard Hart G.G.
Jewelers Gallery
Denver, Co.


#2

Richard…Indeed you are a very lucky man and we are, I’m sure, all
happy it was not worse.

Just a bit more emphasis…As some of you may know, I learned
smithing whilst in Taiwan on a government contract. Several nights
each week for nearly a year, I went to the factory of a jewler friend
where his master craftsmen would teach me. When I got to the roller
mill, it was a large rather roughly made mill powered by a equally
large old electric motor with wires hanging all over the place.

My instructor told me to be careful because there was no emergency
switch on it (indeed safety was not of much import in those early
years on Taiwan) and, if one got his hand stuck in it, the machine
would probably not stop

until it reached the shoulder!!!

Needless to say, I stayed away from it as much as possible. Glad you
had a clutch!!!

Cheers from Don in SOFL


#3

This is one reason why I have my power mill controlled with a foot
switch. If there is a problem I can lift my foot to stop the rolls.
But no matter how you use them you must always be extremely careful
with power mills. I am very glad you did not suffer worse damage.

Speedy recovery,

Jim

James Binnion
James Binnion Metal Arts


#4
This is one reason why I have my power mill controlled with a foot
switch. If there is a problem I can lift my foot to stop the
rolls. But no matter how you use them you must always be extremely
careful with power mills. I am very glad you did not suffer worse
damage 

You were, indeed, very lucky. When I clean my mill I always do it
from the ‘other’ side so that the rolls try to push my fingers away
from danger. The cleaning effect is just as effective and there is no
possibility of being grabbed. Just a suggestion.

Regards, Gary Wooding