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Safety glasses are not created equal


#1

I would assume not all safety glasses are created equal , and
wonder which brands and styles people find best for which work? I am
getting ready to take a workshop that calls for optivisors - what I
have is a sort of off-brand optivisor. Is this likely to be ok? Or
do I have to spring for the name brand?

Thanks!
Beth in SC


#2

Beth, Optivisors are not in any way shape or form safety glasses and
should not be worn with any expectation that they will provide
protection to your eyes they are for magnification only. Safety
glasses are glasses that have lenses that are made from a material
that meets a Government standard for impact resistance. My personal
preference is for the kind that wrap around and provide more side
protection like the 3M Stingrays or 3M Lazers .

Jim Binnion James Binnion Metal Arts Phone (360) 756-6550 Toll Free
(877) 408 7287 Fax (360) 756-2160 http://www.mokume-gane.com
@James_Binnion Member of the Better Business Bureau


#3

I’ve got a question that goes with Beth’s: Are there any good
sources for safety glasses that can be worn-comfortably- over
regular prescription glasses? I had one pair that rubbed the lenses
together and sanded a nice blind spot in my script glasses. I want
safety but I also want to see. Mike


#4
Are there any good sources for safety glasses that can be
worn-comfortably- over regular prescription glasses? 

Hello Michael,

At one point I was having much the same problem you describe. After
trying a number of over-the-glasses options the only solution I found
that I really liked, was comfortable enough, etc was a face shield.

I know it sounds a little over the top but a good face shield is
actually quite comfortable, the shield is replaceable and it gives
you much better protection than a pair of over-the-glasses glasses.
The thing that finally convinced me was the realization that I no
more wanted to be digging metal shards out of my face and teeth than I
did out of my eyes.

Oddly I’ve found that I’m now much more conscientious than I used to
be. There was something about putting those over-glasses on and off
that was unpleasant enough that I tended to avoid it. No such
hesitation with the face shield so in the end I’m much better of
safety wise.

As ever, your mileage may differ.

Cheers,
Trevor F.


#5

Hi, Trevor-

The thing that finally convinced me was the realization that I no
more wanted to be digging metal shards out of my face and teeth
than I did out of my eyes.

Yikes! I didn’t think about my FACE!!! Can you tell me where you
purchased your face shield? Thank you, Stacy


#6
    Are there any good sources for safety glasses that can be
worn-comfortably- over regular prescription glasses? 

I bought OptiMuffs
(http://www.envirosafetyproducts.com/html/Optimuff.htm), which are
ear protection muffs with safety glasses. It comes in two styles;
one is sized to fit over prescription lenses. The eyeshield is
attached to the earmuffs and is fully positionable, so it doesn’t
have to touch your glasses or face.

I use them even when hearing protection is unnecessary, because they
are comfortable and stay in place. That’s particularly important for
me because, like many Asians, I don’t have enough of a nosebridge to
keep regular safety glasses from slipping.

Janet


#7
Yikes! I didn't think about my FACE!!!! Can you tell me where you
purchased your face shield? 

Hello Stacy,

Sure thing. One of my favs: Lee Valley Tools (www.leevalley.com). It
is item 22R0537. Once you hit the front page of their site just type
the item number into the little “Jump to Item” box on the left hand
side and it’ll take you straight to the item details and pricing. It
is currently listed for US$20.

FWIW all the major suppliers have similar products. Rio Grande, for
example, has a lightweight face shield (p.455, item A) for less but
frankly I prefer the greater coverage of Lee Valley’s. I tend to do a
fair amount of tool making and modification and that means a lot of
steel grindings flying around. The Lee Valley shield reaches down to
my chest and it does make a difference in terms of how much ambient
stuff gets to your face. If you wear a “paper” dust mask while you’re
doing a heavy job you can see the difference in the amount of junk
imbedded in the dust mask.

Also pretty much any wood or tool supply depot you walk into will
have at least one or two face shields available. For me the issue was
the availability of replacement shields which many “depot” type
places don’t offer. I use one (severely pitted!) shield for heavy
grinding and cutting, another for regular stuff and a third for
whenever I need maximum clarity. Taking one shield plate off and
replacing it with another takes less than a minute with the Lee
Valley model.

Needless to say you’ll have to judge for yourself how much of my
experience is relevant to your work. I realize that not everybody is
quite as enthusiastic about reshaping their hammers or making a
particular style of punch as I have a habit of being.

As usual the “me happy customer” disclaimer applies.

Cheers,
Trevor F.