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Rounding edges on silver sheet


#1

Hello All! I have a project I am working on that I am using designs
pierced from 18 and 20 gauge sterling sheet. The designs are
moderately complex and small. I need to get a nice even rounded edge
on the outer perimeter of the designs. They are to small to do on
the wheel. I originally thought that I would purchase a concave bur
to go around the edges with, but much to my dismay no such burr seems
to exist. Are there any suggestions out there? Short of trying to
get the whole thing even with a silicone bullet, I am out of ideas.

Thanks in advance!

Shane Morris
Druid’s Grove Unique Gifts


#2

I would use small files for this. There are smaller files than the
needle size. It would be faster than aCratex bullet and there would
not be any rubber and abrasive particles flying around.

Marilyn


#3

For small pieces, I hold them with a flat pair of pliers and sand
with sandpaper that is put in the slit sandpaper holder (?) and use
my fordom like handpiece. It does not seem to take too long for a
single piece.

Larry


#4
  I am using designs pierced from 18 and 20  gauge sterling sheet.
The designs are moderately complex and small.  I need to get a nice
even rounded edge on the outer perimeter of the designs.  They are
to small to do on the wheel.  I originally thought that I would
purchase a concave bur to go around the edges with, but much to my
dismay no such burr seems to exist.  Are there any suggestions out
there? 

Shane - A good way to get a softened edge on interior edges would be
to tumble the pieces in abrasive media. The media should be shaped
to fit, well worn aqua cones or pyramids would to the job. Use a
vibratory tumbler, run the job for six to eight hours in a flow thru
system or change the liquid every two to three hours.

Judy Hoch, G.G.
@Judy_Hoch


#5

I use several methods for rounding edges.

One is to place a sheet on a padded bench pin and hold down with one
hand while running a fine file across one edge and then, turn it over
and do the other.

I use my GRS ring clamp to hold some pieces. Because it swivels, I
can turn it to the most advantageous direction and then use my files,
or in some cases, a sanding stick.

When the pieces are small and would be bent or damaged by other
means, I use my benchtop vice, with leather covered copper jaws. The
wide jaws make it possible to file on long, thin, short pieces
without distortion.

If I had to do a lot of large sheets, I would make a jig… putting
two pieces of wood together, leaving a space just a bit wider than
the thickness of the metal, and wide enough to accommodate the
width. and height. Would then be able to drop the metal in it, and
run the file or sanding stick over it, as the block held it stable.

It is sooo interesting to find how many ways there are to do any one
thing… It makes for a lifetime of learning… and fun.

Frif,