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(round stone) channel -setting mysteries


#1

Hi everyone,

First of all, a brief introduction as this is my first question posted on this excellent forum, although I have followed some really informative threads over the last few weeks. I am keen to learn a good variety of jewellery-making techniques, my particular interests seem to revolve around stone-setting techniques [my day job is a geologist, and I am currently studying for my gemmology diploma… exams tomorrow!..). I have only been making (silver) jewellery for about two years, but my previous job making miniature in-the-ear hearing aids (under the microscope) including moulding the shells etc. involved a lot of the same tools and motor-skills I am now using in jewellery! I hope to experiment with gold in the near future, and also learn more about spin-casting which I am very new to. (ps:Thanks Dave (CrystalGuy) Stephens for your help so far!).
To get to the point (finally), how do you get them little sucker round (brilliant) stones to stay in channel mounts in rings etc.?? I haven’t attempted this method yet because I can’t understand the basic principle. I gather each stone has its own seat to keep it steady, but how are they secured? Is it magic? Is it superglue? Is it crystal power? (no disrespect intended Dave!) Most books I can find here in Tasmania (Australia) only mention this method briefly with one or two confusing pictures,
thanks,

	Laurence Veska.

P.S: Are there any Tasmanian jewellers on Orchid who could demonstrate it sometime?? (beg, beg)!


#2

Laurence Veska wrote:

Hi everyone,

To get to the point (finally), how do you get them little sucker round (brilliant) stones to stay in channel mounts in rings etc.?? I haven’t attempted this method yet because I can’t understand the basic principle. I gather each stone has its own seat to keep it steady, but how are they secured? Is it magic? Is it superglue? Is it crystal power? (no disrespect intended Dave!) Most books I can find here in Tasmania (Australia) only mention this method briefly with one or two confusing pictures,
thanks,

            Laurence Veska.

P.S: Are there any Tasmanian jewellers on Orchid who could demonstrate it sometime?? (beg, beg)!

orchid@ganoksin.com

To Unsubscribe: Email orchid-request@ganoksin.com Body=subscribe
subject=ank

A setting burr is used to make properly sized () in the setting then the
setting is squeezed a bit to close it when all stones are in place.Have
seen them soldered in place to tighten them also but don’t think it is
the best way…I am not a stone setting expert on this type of thing and
I want to know the answers some of the others come up with also…Good
Question!!! You can hold them in place with a bit of spit they tend to
float and thus center themselves in the notches…Gosh isn’t that
strange …GAvin


#3

Laurence Veska wrote:

Hi everyone,

To get to the point (finally), how do you get them little sucker round (brilliant) stones to stay in channel mounts in rings etc.?? I haven’t attempted this method yet because I can’t understand the basic principle. I gather each stone has its own seat to keep it steady, but how are they secured? Is it magic? Is it superglue? Is it crystal power? (no disrespect intended Dave!) Most books I can find here in Tasmania (Australia) only mention this method briefly with one or two confusing pictures,
thanks,

            Laurence Veska.

P.S: Are there any Tasmanian jewellers on Orchid who could demonstrate it sometime?? (beg, beg)!

orchid@ganoksin.com

To Unsubscribe: Email orchid-request@ganoksin.com Body=subscribe
subject=ank

Robert R. Wooding has an great book and also a video on the subject. You
can get them from Rio Grande.
Never having done any channel setting, I took a job of setting 20
diamonds in a band using his book as my only help. The results were
excellent. Very clear instructions.


#4

Laurence,

Been given several ways to channel set stones… was taught to
- ‘Gruve’ the side walls on both sides
- ‘Score’ bottom track where stone will set.
- Set stone in place
Don’t fine it easy, but have seen pros do it
this way … double quick

       -- At a show, a lady, who had only channel set stones

used a ,hammer, then smoothed . . . expensive to
try… have to buy a hammer

        -- Third, as Gavin suggested, use a bur () ... this can look

somewhat tacky if the channel edge is left with a ’ curve

I know the first looks great if you can master it!!!

Jim
around the stone.
1:25 AM 10/15/96 -0500, you wrote:

Laurence Veska wrote:

Hi everyone,

To get to the point (finally), how do you get them little sucker round
(brilliant) stones to stay in channel mounts in rings etc.?? I haven’t
attempted this method yet because I can’t understand the basic principle. I
gather each stone has its own seat to keep it steady, but how are they
secured? Is it magic? Is it superglue? Is it crystal power? (no disrespect
intended Dave!) Most books I can find here in Tasmania (Australia) only
mention this method briefly with one or two confusing pictures,

    thanks,
            Laurence Veska.

P.S: Are there any Tasmanian jewellers on Orchid who could demonstrate it
sometime?? (beg, beg)!

orchid@ganoksin.com

procedures


#5

Laurence,
About your quetion on Channel setting rounds… I have to say that some of
the responses have been very interesting in that I would recomend STRONGLY not
to follow some of them… Channel setting stones is quite easy actually… First
thing you need to do is set up the stones placing them on top of th echannel
to check for correct placement… When you do this it might be a good idea to
take a peice of bees wax and cover the top of the channel so the stones don’t
slip off the peice when you lay them out… The next thing you want to do is,
make sure that the girlde of the stone hangs over the top of the chanel.( the
stones should be larger than the channel itself by about .5mm on each side of
the channel). Now that you have laid out the stones and have checked to be
sure that your stones fit properly, you can begin to cut the seats for your
stones. It is VERY important to cut an individual seat fcor each stone. DO NOT
cut one continuous seat straight across… Use a hart bur to cut the seats.
This is the fun part. Remember now that each stone is slightly bigger than the
channel. You want to cut the seat just deap enough so that you can tilt the
stone in and it should slide down the inside of the channel finally resting in
the oppposite seat. DO NOT over cut the seat. It is very important that you
don’t over cut because you will drive yourself crazy getting them to sit still
while you tighten them. Now that you have succesfully seated your first
stone… It is time to tighten it… DO NOT I REPEAT DO NOT solder them in, nor
do you “squeeze” in on the sides of the channel. If all things are done
correctly (that is the seat being cut) all you should have to tighten the
stone is take a punch (take a broken burr or something and sand the end flat),
and place it on the channel above the seats and gently tap the top of the
punch with your rivetting hammer, do the same to the other side. You may have
to do this several times to tighten the stone but this is the proper way to do
so. It is the same as using a Swiss hammer peice that may cost over $150
bucks. Now that the first stone is in place and tightened sufficiently, cut
the seat for the next stone. Do the exact same thing you have just done to the
first. The only thing you need to do is make sure you line up the seats with
the first stone. Also it is VERY important to make sure that the girdles of
the stones DO NOT TOUCH. If the stones are rubbing up against each other there
is a good chance you will break them when you tighten them. So after you have
set all of your stones go back and make sure they are all tight. If they aen’t
simply take the puch that you made and tap the channel down again. Like I said
before, you will probably have to use the puch alot to make sure they are
tight. But I have to stress, never use solder to tighten them, that is not hte
proper way to do things and it makes for bad clean up after the job is
finished…And also do not squeeze the sides of the channel in , You may crush
the channel all together or you may break a stone… It is just not a good
idea.
I hope I helped you out…
Marc Williams
tdwgold@msn.comFrom: owner-orchid@proteus.imagiware.com on behalf of Laurence Veska
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 1996 2:45 PM
To: Orchid
Subject: (round stone) channel -setting mysteries

Hi everyone,

First of all, a brief introduction as this is my first question posted =
on this excellent forum, although I have followed some really informative=
threads over the last few weeks. I am keen to learn a good variety of =
jewellery-making techniques, my particular interests seem to revolve arou=
nd stone-setting techniques [my day job is a geologist, and I am currentl=
y studying for my gemmology diploma… exams tomorrow!..). I have only bee=
n making (silver) jewellery for about two years, but my previous job maki=
ng miniature in-the-ear hearing aids (under the microscope) including mou=
lding the shells etc. involved a lot of the same tools and motor-skills =
I am now using in jewellery! I hope to experiment with gold in the near =
future, and also learn more about spin-casting which I am very new to. =
(ps:Thanks Dave (CrystalGuy) Stephens for your help so far!).
To get to the point (finally), how do you get them little sucker round =
(brilliant) stones to stay in channel mounts in rings etc.?? I haven’t =
attempted this method yet because I can’t understand the basic principle.=
I gather each stone has its own seat to keep it steady, but how are they=
secured? Is it magic? Is it superglue? Is it crystal power? (no disrespe=
ct intended Dave!) Most books I can find here in Tasmania (Australia) onl=
y mention this method briefly with one or two confusing pictures,
thanks,

	Laurence Veska.

P.S: Are there any Tasmanian jewellers on Orchid who could demonstrate =
it sometime?? (beg, beg)!

procedures


#6

Thomas Williams wrote:

Laurence,
About your quetion on Channel setting rounds… I have to say that some of
the responses have been very interesting in that I would recomend STRONGLY not
to follow some of them… Channel setting stones is quite easy actually… First
thing you need to do is set up the stones placing them on top of th echannel
to check for correct placement… When you do this it might be a good idea to
take a peice of bees wax and cover the top of the channel so the stones don’t
slip off the peice when you lay them out… The next thing you want to do is,
make sure that the girlde of the stone hangs over the top of the chanel.( the
stones should be larger than the channel itself by about .5mm on each side of
the channel). Now that you have laid out the stones and have checked to be
sure that your stones fit properly, you can begin to cut the seats for your
stones. It is VERY important to cut an individual seat fcor each stone. DO NOT
cut one continuous seat straight across… Use a hart bur to cut the seats.
This is the fun part. Remember now that each stone is slightly bigger than the
channel. You want to cut the seat just deap enough so that you can tilt the
stone in and it should slide down the inside of the channel finally resting in
the oppposite seat. DO NOT over cut the seat. It is very important that you
don’t over cut because you will drive yourself crazy getting them to sit still
while you tighten them. Now that you have succesfully seated your first
stone… It is time to tighten it… DO NOT I REPEAT DO NOT solder them in, nor
do you “squeeze” in on the sides of the channel. If all things are done
correctly (that is the seat being cut) all you should have to tighten the
stone is take a punch (take a broken burr or something and sand the end flat),
and place it on the channel above the seats and gently tap the top of the
punch with your rivetting hammer, do the same to the other side. You may have
to do this several times to tighten the stone but this is the proper way to do
so. It is the same as using a Swiss hammer peice that may cost over $150
bucks. Now that the first stone is in place and tightened sufficiently, cut
the seat for the next stone. Do the exact same thing you have just done to the
first. The only thing you need to do is make sure you line up the seats with
the first stone. Also it is VERY important to make sure that the girdles of
the stones DO NOT TOUCH. If the stones are rubbing up against each other there
is a good chance you will break them when you tighten them. So after you have
set all of your stones go back and make sure they are all tight. If they aen’t
simply take the puch that you made and tap the channel down again. Like I said
before, you will probably have to use the puch alot to make sure they are
tight. But I have to stress, never use solder to tighten them, that is not hte
proper way to do things and it makes for bad clean up after the job is
finished…And also do not squeeze the sides of the channel in , You may crush
the channel all together or you may break a stone… It is just not a good
idea.

Depends on many factors involving design and thickness of material
around the stones.When I mentioned squeezing a setting I didn’t mean it
to include use of an automotive/machinists vise!!! ))))Perhaps a 4 ton
hydraulic press you think))) Seriously your ring vise is what I meant
and I have a cheap old wooden one with leather jaws and wooden wedge and
I squeeze the setting a bit but do it your way heck go ahead and use the
punch which for me tends to slip off shattering or scattering
stones…especially such a short one as would be made from a broken
burr.
Have seen one fellow(not me) leave the bottom of the setting wide and
solder 2 strips of small square wire filed with a notch for each stone
to ride in.I would not recommend it either but for him it worked when
he was setting small diamonds.So necessity + lack of knowledge of what
is “accepted procedure” can equal great inventions/discoveries so I
choose not to discourage thought on un-orthodox methods. …G


#7

Marc,

Interested in the Hart Bur cutting!!! Using a graver, you would cut the seat
on each side, one at a time… When you use the hart bur, do you select a bur
that is small enough to do “ONE” side at a time?? If not, doesn’t the bur
distroy the top edge of the channel … giving the appearance of () around
the stone?? Or is this the part of the process that you are using the hammer
on to restore the channel edge??

Jim

At 08:58 PM 10/20/96 UT, you wrote:


#8

Jim,
Choose a hart bur just small enough to clear the other side of the channel
once you have started your seat. To start the seat slightly tip your handpeice
so that the bur is going into the first side at a slight angle. Once you have
started the seat bring the handpaice to a straight position but keep an eye on
the other channel. Once you can cut the seat without touching the other
channel do so, then simply move across to the other side and proceed to cut
that channel. You will find that tipping the stone into one side and slighlty
pushing it (it should, at this point sit realtivley easy into the other side.)
works quite nicely… Anyway in a more simple answer to your question, yes use
a slightly smaller bur, yes do one side at a time. No I don’t damage the top
of either channel… And yes to finally tighten the stones I do use a
hammer-peice. But in regards G. Gilmore I never have a problem slpping off the
channel busting the stones. With practice comes patience my freind…
Good luck and keep the questions coming, I love channel setting, heck I
love setting of all types for that matter…
MarcFrom: owner-orchid@proteus.imagiware.com on behalf of Jim Chambers
Sent: Monday, October 21, 1996 12:18 PM
To: orchid@ganoksin.com
Subject: RE: (round stone) channel -setting mysteries

Marc,

Interested in the Hart Bur cutting!!! Using a graver, you would cut the seat
on each side, one at a time… When you use the hart bur, do you select a bur
that is small enough to do “ONE” side at a time?? If not, doesn’t the bur
distroy the top edge of the channel … giving the appearance of () around
the stone?? Or is this the part of the process that you are using the hammer
on to restore the channel edge??

Jim

At 08:58 PM 10/20/96 UT, you wrote:

Laurence,
About your quetion on Channel setting rounds… I have to say that some of
the responses have been very interesting in that I would recomend STRONGLY
not
to follow some of them… Channel setting stones is quite easy actually…
First
thing you need to do is set up the stones placing them on top of th echannel
to check for correct placement… When you do this it might be a good idea to

take a peice of bees wax and cover the top of the channel so the stones don’t

slip off the peice when you lay them out… The next thing you want to do is,
make sure that the girlde of the stone hangs over the top of the chanel.( the

stones should be larger than the channel itself by about .5mm on each side of

the channel). Now that you have laid out the stones and have checked to be
sure that your stones fit properly, you can begin to cut the seats for your
stones. It is VERY important to cut an individual seat fcor each stone. DO
NOT
cut one continuous seat straight across… Use a hart bur to cut the seats.
This is the fun part. Remember now that each stone is slightly bigger than
the
channel. You want to cut the seat just deap enough so that you can tilt the
stone in and it should slide down the inside of the channel finally resting
in
the oppposite seat. DO NOT over cut the seat. It is very important that you
don’t over cut because you will drive yourself crazy getting them to sit
still
while you tighten them. Now that you have succesfully seated your first
stone… It is time to tighten it… DO NOT I REPEAT DO NOT solder them in,
nor
do you “squeeze” in on the sides of the channel. If all things are done
correctly (that is the seat being cut) all you should have to tighten the
stone is take a punch (take a broken burr or something and sand the end
flat),
and place it on the channel above the seats and gently tap the top of the
punch with your rivetting hammer, do the same to the other side. You may have

to do this several times to tighten the stone but this is the proper way to
do
so. It is the same as using a Swiss hammer peice that may cost over $150
bucks. Now that the first stone is in place and tightened sufficiently, cut
the seat for the next stone. Do the exact same thing you have just done to
the
first. The only thing you need to do is make sure you line up the seats with
the first stone. Also it is VERY important to make sure that the girdles of
the stones DO NOT TOUCH. If the stones are rubbing up against each other
there
is a good chance you will break them when you tighten them. So after you have

set all of your stones go back and make sure they are all tight. If they
aen’t
simply take the puch that you made and tap the channel down again. Like I
said
before, you will probably have to use the puch alot to make sure they are
tight. But I have to stress, never use solder to tighten them, that is not
hte
proper way to do things and it makes for bad clean up after the job is
finished…And also do not squeeze the sides of the channel in , You may
crush
the channel all together or you may break a stone… It is just not a good
idea.
I hope I helped you out…
Marc Williams
tdwgold@msn.com

From: owner-orchid@proteus.imagiware.com on behalf of Laurence Veska
Sent: Tuesday, October 15, 1996 2:45 PM
To: Orchid
Subject: (round stone) channel -setting mysteries

==
Hi everyone,

First of all, a brief introduction as this is my first question posted =
on this excellent forum, although I have followed some really informative=
threads over the last few weeks. I am keen to learn a good variety of =
jewellery-making techniques, my particular interests seem to revolve arou=
nd stone-setting techniques [my day job is a geologist, and I am currentl=
y studying for my gemmology diploma… exams tomorrow!..). I have only bee=
n making (silver) jewellery for about two years, but my previous job maki=
ng miniature in-the-ear hearing aids (under the microscope) including mou=
lding the shells etc. involved a lot of the same tools and motor-skills =
I am now using in jewellery! I hope to experiment with gold in the near =
future, and also learn more about spin-casting which I am very new to. =
(ps:Thanks Dave (CrystalGuy) Stephens for your help so far!).
To get to the point (finally), how do you get them little sucker round =
(brilliant) stones to stay in channel mounts in rings etc.?? I haven’t =
attempted this method yet because I can’t understand the basic principle.=
I gather each stone has its own seat to keep it steady, but how are they=
secured? Is it magic? Is it superglue? Is it crystal power? (no disrespe=
ct intended Dave!) Most books I can find here in Tasmania (Australia) onl=
y mention this method briefly with one or two confusing pictures,
thanks,

  Laurence Veska.

P.S: Are there any Tasmanian jewellers on Orchid who could demonstrate =
it sometime?? (beg, beg)!

orchid@ganoksin.com

procedures

orchid@ganoksin.com

procedures

procedures


#9

Hi Jim

Regarding channel setting, Thomas’s recommendations are good, I’d like
to add one thing. The job looks a lot nicer and is easier if you don’t
"bury" the stones. Very little of the stone needs to be in the metal. I
know of one manufacturing company that tapers the channels slightly
leaving the top of the channel the same width as the stone. They use bud
burs and press the stones into the channel and tap the edge of the
channel over the girdle, leaving almost the entire stone visible. It
looks great, is quick to set, and is secure.

         Jeffrey Everett

Handmade 18K, 22K, and platinum gemstone fine jewelry.
Diamond setting, rubber/metal molds, casting, lapidary
Die and mold engraving, plastic patterns for casting.
Cad jewelry design, cad/cam milling scroll filigree…
P O Box 2057 Fairfield IA 52556 515-469-6250