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Rough garnet crystal setting


#1

I’m trying to set rough Alaskan garnet crystal that comes naturally
faceted though in blunt, undefined angles. It looks like this link
below:

http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/ep7z69
(scroll down to garnets from Alaska)

I want to put it on a ring, originally pinsetting it. It turns out
that garnet is not very high on the Mohs scale, so I have to rethink
how to set it. Is there a way to set/capture rough garnet crystals
in a way to protect the stone and still be able to see it ‘in the
round’ and not look kludgy?

All the best,-Elaine.


#2

Electroforming would get the job done.


#3

Large prong setting with an appropriate seat could also be used.
Garnet is essentially the same hardness as quartz. Normally oft
presents as a shattered crystal… This makes it break into many
small pieces.

John


#4

Peter, I have seen some very unusual rings with stones made by
electroforming. I am familiar with electroforming but how is a ring
made? Wax?

Do you know of any websites/books that show this technique?

Regards, gail
gailwilliamsjewelry.com


#5

Gail- Although electro forming is a great technique to learn, it is
not really suitable for rings. It’s too fragile to hold up against
hand wear. Electro forming is best suited for pendants or sculpture.
It is basically the same technique as bronzing baby shoes. Anything
you can coat with copper powder can be electro formed. Wax, wood,
plastic, whatever. I’ve even electro formed a petrified lizard. Yup,
a lizard. I’ve done some pretty whacky things over the last 43 years
in the trade.

The metal deposits though thicker than electro plating are still
fairly thin.

Still a fun project to try.

Have fun and make lots of jewelry.
Jo Haemer
www.timothywgreen.com


#6

Hi Gail,

I have seen some very unusual rings with stones made by
electroforming. I am familiar with electroforming but how is a
ring made? Wax? Do you know of any websites/books that show this
technique? 

I know of someone who does this for the trade. I will PM you his
contact info and let him know I referred you.

Of course I haven’t seen your stone, but the basic idea would be to
use the electroforming as a sort of bezel that completely conforms
to the stone. In addition, you could incorporate prongs; they would
be ‘sealed’ into the electroformed bezel, as would the shank.
Probably best to keep the shank basic and somewhat light. Maybe a
split shank near the bezel for support.


#7
Of course I haven't seen your stone, but the basic idea would be
to use the electroforming as a sort of bezel that completely
conforms to the stone. 

I like this technique for holding onto irregular stones, but the
only metal I’ve tried it with is copper. Can one electroform in
silver as well? Gold? Palladium? Or is there something special about
copper that makes this work?

Andrew Werby
www.computersculpture.com


#8

Probably the most famous piece of electroformed jewelry is the
coronet made in 1969 for the investiture of the Prince of Wales.
Here’s a photo:


#9

Andrew, You can electro form with pretty much any metal that will
plate. I’ve done both silver and copper. If a gold color was needed I
just gold plated the silver or copper article.

As I stated in my earlier email, electro formed bezels are too
fragile for a ring. Electro forming is a great technique if you need
something large but very lightweight. Such as the Coronet for the
Prince of Wales that Elliot posted a link to.

Have fun and make lots of jewelry.
Jo Haemer
www.timothywgreen.com


#10

Andrew, You can electro form with pretty much any metal that will
plate. I’ve done both silver and copper. If a gold color was needed
I just gold plated the silver or copper article.

As I stated in my earlier email, electro formed bezels are too
fragile for a ring. Electro forming is a great technique if you need
something large but very lightweight. Such as the Coronet for the
Prince of Wales that Elliot posted a link to.

Have fun and make lots of jewelry.
Jo Haemer
www.timothywgreen.com