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Rolling mill stand


#1

I received the best xmas present ever, a Durston C150 rolling mill. I
now need a stand and am wondering whatto get. He suggested a basic
Kobaltbench grinder stand but I’m wondering if I need something
turdier. What would you recommend?

Mo in NH


#2

Mo,

Congratulations on your wonderful gift. About the base, Rio carries
the base under Jay Whaley’s double unit. The other two are simply
bolted to a wooden work bench. All work well.

Terrie


#3

I piece of I-beam with a plate welded on the top and bottom, bolted
into the floor with ramsets… well that’s what I’d do :wink: CIA


#4

i have the durston stand and surprisingly, the holes didn’t line up
with the durston mill despite the fact that they were sold as a
set!!! i didn’t buy directly from durston but rather through
metalliferous, but it was annoying to have to attach the stand to
some wood and the roller to the wood in order to work around it. so
regardless of what you do, just make sure the bolt spacing is the
same before you purchase!


#5

Hi Mo,

I have my rolling mill mounted to the end of my bench, which is not a
standard jeweler’s bench, but is much longer home made bench. I
really like having it right at hand, and it makes for a very sturdy
stand. Just make sure you give clearance for your handle!

Best,
Teresa


#6

Teresa,

Rolling mills create a lot of force when they are being used. I
really recommend mounting your rolling mill to a heavy bench, mounted
to the wall, or bolted to a sturdy steel stand and bolted to the
floor. Many small jeweler’s benches just aren’t heavy enough to mount
a rolling mill to.

One of my students, a metal fabricator, made and installed a rolling
mill and stand for a fellow student which was most excellent. He made
a heavy metal plate and drilled holes for the mill, then welded the
plate to a heavy walled steel pipe. He then came into the studio,
which had a concrete floor, and brought a machine that quickly
drilled a hole in the floor the same diameter as the pipe. Once the
stand was fitted into the hole in the floor and made straight, he put
in a special quick drying epoxy which set up in minutes. The rolling
mill on its stand just seem to just grow out of the floor, and was
super sturdy!

Jay Whaley


#7

A grinder stand will work if the height is not too tall for the
user. I have an old Dixon non-reduction gear rolling mill and I have
mine mounted to where the pivot for the handle is slightly below my
waist when I’m standing. I found this is the best position for the
most leverage. Also, you will want to bolt your rolling mill stand to
the floor or make a platform to mount it on that you can stand on
while rolling. I made mine from some 2x10’s from an old waterbed. The
base is around 2 foot by 3 foot.

Rick Copeland
rockymountainwonders.com


#8

Re rolling mill bases, I attend a local art center (and love the
jewelry classes - been going 10 years now), and one of the
attractions is the equipment, including a rolling mill. It is bolted
to a very heavy table.

Unfortunately, the powers that be won’t let us bolt the heavy table
to the floor ( which is a very solid one as the building was
originally a flour mill). So when we need to roll something, some of
us sit on the table to hold it down while the handle is being
cranked. Funny, and it works! Love the Center, love the Orchid
Forum.

Noralie Katsu


#9

Thanks Jay,

You know I never really considered the torque of the thing while in
use, and there IS some of wiggling of my entire bench while I am
rolling. I will probably build it a stand this Spring, once the
weather allows for access to the garage and my table saw, I think I
will take your advice. It would most probably not cause so much wear
on my bench, and allow for use by another if I ever am sharing my
studio, (which I hope to be doing some day). I am certain my Hubby
can secure it to the floor with masonry screws and it would probably
be a little safer to use.

Best,
Teresa


#10
So when we need to roll something, some of us sit on the table to
hold it down while the handle is being cranked. 

In my shop, rolling mill is bolted to a table, which is free
floating so to speak. If you using rolling mill correctly, there is
no need for a table to be secured, and a lot of reasons to have free
floating. I am surprised that your instructor allows you to do what
you are doing.

Leonid Surpin
www.studioarete.com


#11
I am surprised that your instructor allows you to do what you are
doing. 

Yep students sitting on a table is a colossal waste of time, this is
really important when it comes to third year, when there’s no time
spare, and projects are put together by the skin of your pants. Or
so it seems to be at Enmore TAFE.

I’m sort of planning now for my third year projects, so that I wont
be rushed and can spend the time I need to do an excellent job.

Regards Charles A.


#12
In my shop, rolling mill is bolted to a table, which is free
floating so to speak. If you using rolling mill correctly, there
is no need for a table to be secured, and a lot of reasons to have
free floating. I am surprised that your instructor allows you to do
what you are doing. 

Yeah, I wondered about that too. Seems to me that most of the time,
if you’re having to sit on a heavy table in order to be able to
secure it enough to turn the handle on the mill, you’re probably
taking too deep a bite on the metal. Back off a bit so it takes more
passes through the mill but with less effort with each pass. Taking
too deep a bite all at once with a mill can sometimes damage the
mill, and can increase the chances of having problems with things
like cracking the metal as you roll it…

Peter


#13
if you're having to sit on a heavy table in order to be able to
secure it enough to turn the handle on the mill, you're probably
taking too deep a bite on the metal.

There is a difference between geared and ungeared mills, though. At
work, we use a small ungeared mill bolted to a steel bench, and it
can take some elbow grease to turn it. On the other hand, when I’m
at Loughborough Uni, they have a geared mill that is on a tall stand,
andnot even bolted to the floor - the gears mean that several gentle
turns of the handle are needed for each pass. So, it takes a lot
less force, but requires a lot more time. Swings and roundabouts.
Having said that, I’m a bit confused by why anyone would be sat on a
table while using a rolling mill.

Jamie
http://primitive.ganoksin.com


#14

i like the stamped sheet steel put together yourself ones, from
home/garden centre stores about $50 u.s. …generally used for table
top woodworking equipment. i have a shear and mill on mine. is this
gonna create a show-n-tell? :wink:

hth
richard


#15

Here’s a heavy-duty, pre-built solution for $60 (plus shipping).
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/28

It’s only 24" high - not sure if this is adequate height?

Jamie