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Rolling mill oil


#1

The instructions that came with my rolling mill advised the use
of a light oil such as 3-in-1 household oil, applied with a soft
rag. Keeps the rollers in pristine condition. Incidentally,I also
use the rolling mill to flatten out solder sheet or even wire
solder so it can be cut easily into paillons . I keep the
hard,medium and soft solder bits in carefully labeled contact lens
cases so it’s easy to reach, portable and always ready.


#2

I recently received a rolling mill, but alas, no instructions at
all! I’ll have to remember your suggestion about 3-in-1 oil . . .
anything else helpful would be greatly appreciated! Thanks in
advance.


#3

Fishbre - if you missed my suggestion, WD40 sprayed on lightly
works great! Gini


#4
      I recently received a rolling mill, but alas, no
instructions at all!  I'll have to remember your suggestion about
3-in-1 oil . . . anything else helpful would be greatly
appreciated!  Thanks in advance.

Dear Fishbre(?), Find a Machinist supply source in your area and
ask for “Low Sulfer Oil” . From my understanding,this is the best
for rust-prevention. I find that 3-in-1 oil can get “gummy”.
Vegetable based oils like 3-in-1,can attract and hold dirt and
dust. Also, try to avoid pinning the rolls together and cranking
them together, as this will only force any dust(commonly 6 on the
Moh scale, thus harder than even the case-hardening of the rolls!).

Eben Lenz


#5

Dear Fishbre396@aol.com

I also had recently purchased a brand spanking new Durston Mill
(what a beauty) but also alas…I received no instructions either!
But through careful consideration and experimentation decided that
this little goodie is a do-all/end-all to roller cleaning issues.
You can buy any brand I presume because the ingredients I am sure
will be the same for each manufacturer. The product I am speaking
about can be bought at any electrical supply or large hardware
outlet…“Switch & Contact Cleaner” The list on what this cleans
is endless…and I have found for cleaning rollers on my rolling
mill it is indispensable! Please feel free to respond on this issue,
Happy to oblige!

Bryna Tracy
smartdog@msn.com
Metalogic


one of a kind jewellery and design


#6
   I recently received a rolling mill, but alas, no instructions
at all!  I'll have to remember your suggestion about 3-in-1 oil .
. . anything else helpful would be greatly appreciated! 

It was explained to me NEVER use a lubricant with detergent
(cleaning agent). It will ruin your rolling mill. I use an oil
that my husband uses to lubricate his chain saw blade!


#7

I too use WD-40 on my rolling mill as well as on the rolling
mill in the workshop where I teach. The stuff is fantastic.
Read an article not too long ago that it was also good to put on
arthritic joints. I haven’t tried it yet but I wonder if any of
you have heard this as well.

Iris Stuecklen
Baltimore MD USA


#8

I have a confession. My rolling mill is about 16-17 years old. I
paid, what, maybe $600 for it. For about two of those years, it
sat in storage, but has otherwise been in continual use by one to
five jewelers. Right now there are two of us. I have been abusive
in the sense that I normally jump on it. I have rolled spring
steel as well as passed acids and sand through it. It is slightly
pitted. I don’t care. It works fine. At this rate, I am sure that
it will outlive me. I don’t go out of my way to care for it. I
oil it about once a year or two. The only experience that I
personally regret is the spring steel. I recommend that one not
roll spring steel through one. A good rolling mill is hard to
beat. Kinda like trying to destroy an anvil.

Bruce D. Holmgrain
@Bruce_Holmgrain
http://205.177.16.22
703-593-4652


#9

Hi, funny this. I also bought a Durston (?) rolling mill recently
and - No instructions what so ever. I asked in the shop but they
did not have any - They just said: oil it now and then…

A week after I was visiting an Army Supply store and I found a tin
with Standard Army roller bearing oil for almost nothing. I figured
out that if this is good enough for heavy duty bearings in the
Army it would be good enough for my Rolling Mill. Am I wrong?

R G D S Lars Dahlberg/Gotland/Sweden


#10

I too use WD-40 on my rolling mill as well as on the rolling
mill in the workshop where I teach. The stuff is fantastic.
Read an article not too long ago that it was also good to put on
arthritic joints. I haven’t tried it yet but I wonder if any of
you have heard this as well.

And they spray it on lures in the Northwest area when fishing.
Supposed to work very well!!