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Riveting stake blocks


#1

Hello everyone!

I am trying to make some White gold pins to use with pearls and I
wanted to know what you use to make the flat head? I am using some
gold wire (26 gauge) and melting a ball at the end. I haven’t been
able to find a riveting stake block that was this small a wire size.
What do you use? And where can I get it?

Thanks


#2

Hi,

May I suggest a round wire draw plate. You can get one at just about
any jewelry supply shop like Rio Grande. I use mine with good
success.

Good luck,

Ken Moore
www.kenworx.com


#3

Hi Scott:

If I understand you correctly, you’re trying to take a small piece of
wire, ball the end, and then flatten out the ball into a disc on the
end of the wire, at right angles to it, correct? The usual trick is
to feed the wire backwards through a drawplate, using the smallest
hole it’ll fit through, and then very carefully peening it out
against the backside of the plate. Do NOT try this if you’ve got a
tungsten drawplate though. You can also make a two part heading jig,
but it’s a pain in the tail.

FWIW,
Brian.


#4

I just use the reverse side of the drawplate - great for small gauge
wire…

Jeni


#5
I am trying to make some White gold pins to use with pearls and I
wanted to know what you use to make the flat head? I am using some
gold wire (26 gauge) and melting a ball at the end. I haven't been
able to find a riveting stake block that was this small a wire
size. What do you use? And where can I get it? 

Try a steel (not carbide) drawplate. While there’s sometimes a bit
of a taper to the hole on the “exit” side of the plate, it’s often
not that much, and the fit will be usually close enough to work fine.
At least, it’s done so for me when I needed to do that. The drawplate
gives you a finely graduated choice of holes to use, so you can get a
well fitted hole for your stake. Do be gentle doing this, and support
the back side of the plate, such as over the partially opened jaws of
a vise. Really whacking the plate with a big hammer, and not
supporting the plate, could concievably crack some of the plates if
they’re hardened, as most of them are. But small flat head pins such
as you’re making don’t need that big a hammer to make.

Peter


#6

a watchmakers octagonal anvil works great. They are available from
most suppliers- mine is aK&D brand anvil that I got from Rosenthal’s
jewelry supply in Miami (by mail order). I had my first from
Cookson’s in the UK- almost any watchmaking supplier sells them- It
has pre drilled holes for various gauges of wirte and tubing as well
as an anvil on the reverse side for flattening small pieces of
metal.It is stainless steel and doesn’t cost a fortune- with a light
machine oil or application of cosmoline, or other protectant ( even
dry lithium spray) it should last years without failing. Remember if
you live in an humid area to oil inside the holes though as most
people don’t oil the entire anvil of this type and oxides set in even
in stainless over time and with bits of non-ferrous ( i.e. brass,
gold filled etc.) material lodged in the sets.

rer