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Ring Sizing standards


#1

Hello all!

I apologize if this topic has been addressed before, but I need your
wisdom and help! I’m new to the art of making rings commercially and
am having a heck of a time getting the right size bands! I have a
ring mandrel with the size markings, but can’t seem to get it right.
I have several bands in various size, none of which are correct for
my current customer. This is especially problematic when I need to
cut the band out of sheet metal.

Any tips on equipment, ideas, etc. are welcome.

Thanks - Tammy Kirks


#2
    I apologize if this topic has been addressed before, but I
need your wisdom and help! I'm new to the art of making rings
commercially and am having a heck of a time getting the right size
bands! I have a 

Hi Tammy,

I’m not exactly sure what you are asking here but I’ll take a shot
at answering. You need a set of ring sizers that your customers can
try on. (I find that a set of individual loose rings is better than
the set that is connected together.) They have the size stamped on
the side. You also need a ring sizing mandrel. Unfortunately,
sometimes the “try-on” sizers do not index properly with the mandrel.
My suggestion is to use the “try-on” sizers and then use the same
ring to determine the spot on your mandrel where you will actually be
fabricating the ring. It may or may not be the same number. Lastly,
you need to compensate for the thickness of your ring stock by adding
that measured amount to its overall length. Also, your "try-on"
sizers should be as close as possible to the actual width of your
ring stock or you may be adding an extra problem in trying to
transfer the size to your mandrel. In other word, broad stock then
broad sizer… narrow stock then narrow sizer.

I hope this helps. I tried to make it as understandable as
possible.

dennis


#3
    I apologize if this topic has been addressed before, but I need
your wisdom and help! I'm new to the art of making rings
commercially and am having a heck of a time getting the right size
bands! 

To measure rings with precision you need the “Bergeon” No.5235
"Swiss Made" it is an aluminium ring stick. Beware of look a likes I
saw one that looked great as I already have Bergeon and when I
returned with it I found it was a knock off and it is no good.
Bergeon also has 4 different types of measurements, U.S., European in
mm, diameter in mm, and another one that I don’t know or use. The
British use the alphabet a whole different measurement not on the
Bergeon.

I am on old professional and had to go to that one to produce our
precision P.F.F. Ring Clasps. We make our measuring kits all to the
Bergeon standards.

When I first got into producing precision mechanisms I wasn’t aware
that the bench mandrel, which I still use, was no longer good to
measure, it is only good for rounding up rings. As I found that over
the years it had worn down in the most popular size range. And it is
a high quality old time one, possibly over 60 years old, the kind you
can no longer get, today the only ones that are sold are junk from
India, If they paid them I’m sure that they could make good ones too.

But today tool supplies don’t care and sell you junk and if you knew
what they paid for them then you would understand why there is no
more quality ring mandrels. I wouldn’t be surprised to hear that they
pay them .25 cents per mandrel and they cost the consumer $30.00 more
or less. They just get away with it and everybody is trying to
measure rings to do their best and messing about. I remember having
to be in sink with an other’s mandrel to know what size he meant.
What a waste of time doing jobs over and over just so the tool
sellers can make greedy profits.

Now there must be lots out there with the same problem. But no
longer here as I check all rings with the Swiss Bergeon ring stick.
But have to watch for wear as well, as every time you slip a ring on
the stick you loose a little.

It is aluminum after all but should last a good fifteen years
without abuse. I have two so I can counter check periodically to be
sure there are no changes.

Allan Creates
@pff
P.O. Box 51 Cote St-Luc
Montreal, Quebec
Canada
Tel: 514-488-7553
Fax: 514-489-7299
Superringfit.com
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