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Ring fit issues- dry skin?


#1

Hello, I’m a machinist new to jewelry and just made my first
commisioned mens wedding ring. It has outer lobes to reasonably
weight balance the design. The problem- it fits the owner pretty well
(perhaps a quarter size large at most), yet rotates heavy side down
when doing chores like typing. I put this ring on one of my fingers
with a similar fit to his and had no problem of rotation under any
circumstances. The only theory we have to explain our differences,
is his excessively dry skin. Does anyone have experience with this
phenomenon, or have another possible explanation? Will it help to
achieve absolute balance, and/ or snug the fit a bit? I thank you in
advance. Jeffrey McWhinney


#2

Jeffrey, Welcome to the jewelry world! The problems you have
described are common to ring sizing. There are several issues
here…one is dry hands, another is the difference between knuckle
size vs upper finger size, the specific shape of the inside ring
shank is another.

Often you will find that the size to get a ring over the knuckle is
such that when worn above the knuckle the ring is too loose, even
with sweaty palms. One way to prevent this is to solder sizing balls
into the lower quadrants of the shank (see archives on sizing balls).
Another is to alter the shape of the inside shank similar to a
"comfort fit" style. The inside is made more rounded rather than
flat. This better allows compressed skin to enter the ring (i.e. slip
over a large knuckle easier) and yet the inside diameter can be a bit
larger than if it were flat. If the condition is really acute, there
are shanks that actually snap open on the market, see Stuller or some
other suppliers. Another factor has to do with the width of the
shank. Narrow shanks tend to allow more flopping around than wide
because there is more friction in the latter…there is more skin to
hold the ring in position.

If you can make the signet side of the ring a bit lighter by
hollowing out the back etc, that might help stop the flopping as
well. Remember that each person’s fingers are constructed
differently and while it may not flop on your finger, it may on
dozens of others even of the same size (approx).

Hope this is of some help to you…cheers from Don at The Charles
Belle Studio in SOFL where simple elegance IS fine jewelry!
@coralnut1


#3

Hi Jeffery I found that on heavy men’s rings if I square the bottom
of the ring it stops most of the rolling around. You can buy a
squared mandrel from Rio or most other tool suppliers.

Karen Bahr “the Rocklady” (@Rocklady)
K.I.S. Creations
May your gems always sparkle.


#4

G’day; My simple suggestion is to go to a good sports shop and get
a small amount of the rosin that parallel, asymmetric bar, and weight
lifting athletes use to increase friction between the bar and their
hands. Warm the ring and rub the rosin (usually a powder) on the
inside.

This suggestion comes from when I found the steering wheel of my car
inconveniently slippery. I do have a very dry skin. I applied the
rosin and it is exactly right now; not sticky, but I get a good grip.
Pity I can’t apply it to my brain. – Cheers for now,

John Burgess; @John_Burgess2 of Mapua, Nelson NZ


#5
   Jeffrey, Welcome to the jewelry world!  The problems you have
described are common to ring sizing.  There are several issues
here...one is dry hands, another is the difference between knuckle
size vs upper finger size, the specific shape of the inside ring
shank is another. 
Another suggestion: A c shape piece of metal as wide as the shank

that goes up a little over half way up each side toward the
top,centered on the bottom of the inside of the ring. Hard or low
temp soldered, depending on stones in the ring. This piece can be
bent in from each side as needed to make a good fit.

Richard in Denver