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Ring files


#1

Hi Guys,

Apart from Vallorbe can you name a manufacturer that makes ring
files. I keep drawing a blank, tried a few industrial sources like
Bahco, Nielsen and Bokker, but they don’t come close.

We’ve got a few issues obtaining ring files in cut “0” and “00”.

Just need to source another supplier, due to non-existent supply.

Kindest regards
Charles A.


#2
Apart from Vallorbe can you name a manufacturer that makes ring
files. 

Grobet

Here’s a "0"

and here’s a "00"

Paf Dvorak


#3

Hi

I am looking for a 0 ring file, have to use a half round file
instead. Does the job but not great. Then go to ring file 2/0 then
4/0. Then to shofu green cylinder then sandpaper.

This perplexes me, how do others remove quantities of metal from the
inside of hollow back bezels in rings? Richard.


#4

I almost never use files. And never the round cylinder rubber wheels
too expensive. Instead I have 6 sand paper mandrels each with a
different grit of sand paper starting with 80 grit and ending with
2,000 grit. Much faster then a hand file and I can shape the end by
tearing the sand paper to a taper if that is what I need. Or squaring
it for a sharp edge.


#5

I think Grobet sells Vallorbe, and there are blocks in place that
prevent Grobet from on-selling Vallorbe files to us.

I think I’ve found an Italian file maker, and thus far the files
look awesome quality. I’ll let you know the more I found out.

Kindest regards Charles A.


#6

Hi

like Vernon

Instead I have 6 sand paper mandrels each with a different grit of
sand paper 

I use these as well and also have tapered ones cone shaped. But I
still find for the initial removal of metal on the inside of a hollow
bezel ring the 0 file is fastest and starts to get the shape I want.

Richard


#7

All of this is from memory so if I get anything wrong, I apologize
in advance. Frederick Dick, available from Rio Grande (I’m pretty
sure) should be a good substitute. Very high quality Swiss or German
made, but their numbering system is a little different, like a Dick
#00 is nearly the same as a Grobet #0, or something like that. Refer
to the Rio Grande website or catalog for details. Rio ships to Oz,
right?

Valorbe is made by (or distributed by) Grobet, I believe. Valtitan
is another type of file distributed by Grobet, designed to reduce
clogging. They are lighter colored metal, have a bright yellow
painted tang and they use the same numbering system as other Grobet
Swiss files. I love them for platinum and sterling, but they are
kinda pricey. As long as you don’t touch a diamond with them, they’ll
last nearly forever, so they’re worth the extra $$$, imo. All are
available as larger hand files, like 6 inch barrette, half-round and
flat and also as needle and escapement files.

Habilis is another brand I’ve used in the past, but I’m not sure
they are still around. Used to get them from Swest and/or Gesswein, I
think. I’ve still got a few Habilis needle files around that have to
be twenty or thirty years old and are still pretty sharp. Contrary to
common wisdom, I use all of my files on all of my metals. I card them
often and have never had an issue. I do keep wax files separate
though, mainly because I like them to be the most sharp and clean of
all my files.

I grind inside rings with a carbide inside ring bur on my flexshaft,
check size and round on the mandrel again and then go straight to
sandpaper on the polishing lathe. Old tradework trick, much faster
and produces a cleaner, straighter result than filing and rubber
wheels, even if it is a bit less forgiving. You just hafta pay close
attention, use a high speed and a very light touch.

At the lathe I use a straight (not tapered) wooden split mandrel
with a strip of 80 grit Lightning Metalite cloth (Gesswein). I have
three (or more) going at any given time, one with a fairly new piece,
one that’s somewhat worn and one that’s just about wasted. When the
most worn one finally blows out, I load a new piece of cloth in that
mandrel and move them all down one space. I use them as three
different grits and try to break in the newest piece on a fresh
casting or comfort fitting something heavy. After sanding I go to 800
white diamond or bobbing compound on a felt inside ring buff, and
finish from there.

Dave Phelps