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Resizing stone set rings


#1

Hello everyone

I work with silver 925

A lot of rings with all sorts of stones (jasper, ruby, onyx etc)
Often, the ring is either too small or too big for a specific
customer, ans I’m afraid to attempt changing the size due to the risk
of cracking.the stone It is also too complicated / costly to unset
the stone(s) Someone told me about a technique where you immerse the
stone in water, and then go about soldering the ring. Any clues ?
Rings are my favorites, and my customers too !

Thank you


#2

you can also use wet sand, place the stone and head in the sand and
then work on the shank. Of course, the stone can still be damaged /
burned by the indirect heat. The only safe way to work/solder a
stone set ring is to remove the stone(s).

John
http://rasmussengems.ganoksin.com/blogs/


#3

Cecile, I have sized many rings with the method you described. This
is used for rings which have to be cut to make the proper size, many
rings do not need to be cut to size. Rings which need to be sized
down almost always need to be cut to size. What I do is cut it to
size and use the spring tension from both ends of the shank to hold
the solder after making sure the seam is as properly fit as
possible. I usually use EZ silver solder. I then use a tuna can to
hold the ring and water. I block up the ring in with pieces of the
ceramic honey comb soldering surface that I use which have broken in
the tuna tin. The ceramic pieces hold the ring seam side up and I
pour water into the can just to the top of the back of the bezel. The
least amount of water which will keep the stone safe is what I am
after, the more water, the more heat necessary to get the solder to
flow. I don’t want the water to come up the sides of the shank
anymore than necessary. I flux the seam with paste flux inside and
out. I use an oxy/acet torch with a welding flame ( very hot) and I
wear welding tinted glasses. I put the flame to the seam and jerk it
away as fast as the solder flows.

I have been able to do heavy and thin shanks like this but I have
years of experience. I have been able to solder turquoise set rings
as well as coral set rings but I only do this if it is easier and
less dangerous to the stone than removing the stone which has to be
the first consideration. I work fast and HOT, the water sizzles and
when the flame is away I douse the whole ring with water to cool it
more quickly. No worry about thermal fracturing since water is
already around the stone.

If you are ever in the Tucson area I would be happy to demonstrate
this or anything else I know about to who ever comes along.

Sam Patania, Tucson


#4

Fill up a small tin can with sand and pour water into it until the
sand is saturated. Bury the ring into the wet sand with just the
shank protruding above the sand. Solder as normal but with a low
melting point (easy solder). I use this method with all sorts of
stones with no damage.

Good luck
Rick


#5
I work fast and HOT, the water sizzles and when the flame is away I
douse the whole ring with water to cool it more quickly. No worry
about thermal fracturing since water is already around the stone. 

Very fast and HOT, just, water, no sand, goo or paper, solder clamped
in joint when possible, big O/A torch. Memorize where every thing is,
you don’t want to have to think or see. Hesitation will kill you
every time, good setup, 5 - 10 seconds and you are done.

jeffD
Demand Designs
Analog/Digital Modelling & Goldsmithing
http://www.gmavt.net/~jdemand