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Rendering services


#1

I am looking for someone who does jewelry renderings. I have several
designs in mind (literally ‘in my mind’). Usually I just start
fabricating stuff based on rather loose sketches. Or, I make a
prototype in wax or PMC. However, Ineed a more professional drawing
and need to hire someone who does this professionaly. If anyone on
Orchid does this or can reccomend someone please let me know. Thanks


#2

Hey Dawn, You might want to check out Tim’s book on Rendering. It is
an excellent manual that teaches the process of jewellery rendering
(it makes it easy!).

Linda


#3

G.I.A. offers a class called “Counter Sketching” which will teach you
to do this yourself. Available in person or by correspondence
course. David Barzilay, Lord of the Rings


#4

Hey Dawn, You might want to check out Tim’s book on Rendering. It is
an excellent manual that teaches the process of jewellery rendering
(it makes it easy!).

I too am interested in this matter so I ask you Tim who? And where
might I find his book & under what title? Thank you, Cynthia


#5

Are you trying to learn about rendering/drawing or are you looking
for someone to do some rendering for you? There are a fwew CAD
artists on here (I’m one) who do rendering all the time, maybe could
hlp you out?

Wayne


#6

Dear Dawn:

You’ve got me wondering. I can understand needing a more
"professional rendering" from someone with well-honed drawing
skills, but how is one to draw what’s in your mind? As a former
scientific illustrator, I can tell you, it’s pretty tough to draw
what’s in someone else’s mind. (I’ve done it, but I’ve also had a
fair idea of what the person thought he was seeing :wink: . I’ve
speculated a great deal on the thin line between observation and
wishful thinking.)

It requires a lot of interplay back and forth between illustrator
and the “envisioner”. Think of the police artist sketches we’re all
seen that end up looking very little like the perpetrator. If all
you have are rough sketches, the two of you would probably have to
be sitting down together to work on this. It would be time consuming
and probably, very expensive; unless you contact your local art or
fashion trade school or community college and see if you can find an
illustration student who’s willing to do this for the experience. If
you go ahead and complete the pieces first, rendering from a
finished piece is quite staightforward. It all depends on the
purpose for which you need the renderings. Obviously, if it’s a
proposal, you don’t want to do the work first.

I feel every artist, regardless of medium, regardless of work style,
should know how to draw, and draw effectively. If for no other
reason, it saves you a great deal of time. I can’t imagine working
without design and construction issues resolved on paper ahead of
time. I start out most major pieces with a full working drawing, to
scale, with shading, exploded to show steps of construction, layers,
soldering sequence, etc. I draw out templates to cut pieces with,
which I save. It takes all of ten-fifteen minutes. It gives you a
good work record too. If someone wants a variation later, even years
later, it’s much faster to pull it together. I’m not trying to put
down your work approach. I’m envious of people who can grab a piece
of metal and run with it, or let serendipity take a role. Drawing is
just such a useful tool I can’t imagine not exploiting it to its
fullest. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve whipped out a pencil
and designed a pair of matching earrings to go with a pendant a
customer just bought. Shorter? No problem. Skinnier? Scrunched a
little bit over here? Flared out over there? No problem. When it’s
fully on paper they know exactly what they’re going to get.

This said; you already know how to sketch. Take it one step further.
Refine it, tighten it, clean up the lines. Practice drawing
everything to exact size. Practice shading. You’re already more than
halfway there. Tim McCreight’s book on "Practical Jewelry Rendering"
looks good.

Good Luck.

Lin lahlum


#7
    I too am interested in this matter so I ask you Tim who? And
where might I find his book & under what title? Thank you, Cynthia 

“Practical Jewelry Rendering”, by Tim McCreight Brynmorgen Press ISBN
0-9615984-4-1 email: tim@brynmorgen.com


#8

Dawn, If you are in need of professional rendering services, contact
me offline. I have a very good friend who works as a professional
jewelry renderer in New York City. She is well versed in fuzzy
descriptions and can be the hands for your ideas.

-karen
Karen Christians
M E T A L W E R X
10 Walnut St.
Woburn, MA 01801
Phone:781/937-3532
Fax: 781/937-3955
http://www.metalwerx.com/
Accredited Jewelry Instruction


#9

Dawn and Cynthia, You might want to take a look at TECHNIQUES OF
JEWELRY ILLUSTRATION AND COLOR RENDERING by Adolfo Mattiello. It
offers comprehensive instruction on full color rendering of jewelry
in a clear step by step fashion. It covers pencil sketching in
perspective and in multiple view formats. Judith Evans, among
others, shows how to lay in color to build rich dimensional images.
Rendering gold and gems is covered very well. Also, tips on
materials, overlays, etc. are included.

The book is available from the usual suppliers (Rio Grande,
Gesswein, Frei & Borel, etc.) or directly from the author
(www.du-matt.com). You can buy the book alone or with a set of five
templates. The book is around $38-$40 and the template set runs
around $60. If you buy the set, there is about a $10 savings.

Seriously, if you were to go through the steps as instructed, you
would end up with a very presentable rendering.

HTH, Donna P.S. I do have a conflict of interest here. Adolfo
Mattiello is a good friend and I did some technical editing on
sections of the book. But that aside, I sincerely think that this is
one of the better, if not the best teaching manual on rendering available
today.