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Removing 18k plate from chain


#1

It seems that more and more new chains and bracelets that are
10k or 14k are being plated 18k to make them look more yellow.
Well, when you solder on it, the plate comes off and has to be
18k pen plated for it to match the color again. This is extra
time and materials. I was wondering if the problem could be
approached from a different angle - is it possible to strip the
plate off? If so, would this be more difficult than replating? I
don’t hold out much hope for an easy answer but just thought I’d
try :slight_smile:

Rick Laspada
Westtxn@worldnet.att.net


#2

For some odd reason, Italian chain manufacturers often apply an
18kt “Hamilton Plate” on their offerings. I wish that they
would stop, but until they get the hint , here is what we do . We
swish the entire chain in a denatured alcohol- borax solution,
then place it on a soldering block and light it. It will get
fairly hot. After letting it cool, I run a gas only flame (no
oxygen) slowly over the chain. If it is a light chain, be very
careful, because the chain will turn itself may want to melt.
Heavier chains are usually not a problem. While still warm, we
pickle the chain, and then tripoli lightly. This method may not
remove 100% of the plate, but should get rid of a good portion of
it. Good luck ! RDR


#3

I was wondering if the problem could be approached from a
different angle - is it possible to strip the plate off? If so,
would this be more difficult than replating? I >>

Most of the chain I purchase for resale is made in Italy. The
10kt and the 14kt are both heavily plated to look like 18kt. My
guess is that because 18kt is the minimum standard for gold in
most of Europe, anything that doesn’t look like 18kt must be
’fake’. there fore, the plating.

In any case, it is a problem when your customer wants to match
an American made charm, pendant, or the like to the Italian made
chain. I simply polish the color off with rouge on the polishing
lathe. Personally, I prefer slow speed, but it is very
dangerous. You must support the chain carefully and not allow it
to be LOOSE IN ANY WAY. It can be grabbed by the wheel, and
potentially very dangerous. I usually only allow appx. 2 inches
or less at a time to touch the wheel, reversing when I reach the
lock.

Natuarally, if you are taking a customer’s chain in for repair,
warn them in advance of the color change, and let them make the
decision.

Hope this has helped
regards, allan Freilich