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Rehydrating dried out PMC


#1

Hello everyone quick question, can you re-hydrate dried out PMC and
what is the best way to do it?

Thanks for any info you can pass on.
Sean


#2

If the PMC is totally dry: Chop into small, evenly sized pieces. Use
a tissue blade. Or a pepper grinder. Place this chopped up stuff into
a piece of Saran Wrap, add water using an eye dropper, add less than
to cover. Wrap up, place inside a container with a tight fitting lid,
set aside, allow water to absorb. Add more water if necessary.

If the PMC is not totally dry, but just getting crumbly: Place in
Saran Wrap, add one or two drops of PMC Extender Liquid, knead it in
THROUGH the Saran Wrap. Set it aside (in a container) to absorb for
10 to 30 minutes.

Elaine

Elaine Luther
Metalsmith, Certified PMC Instructor
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools for Metal Clay


#3

Hi there Sean,

re-hydrating PMC isn’t all that difficult. However, I will have to
warn you, the reconstituted stuff simply won’t be quite as nice as
it is fresh out of the packet. First of all, it depends on how
quickly you need it. If you don’t need it right away, you can spray
the lump a little bit every day or so with a little water, and then
keep it sealed tightly with a small wad of moistened paper towel to
help maintain some humidity in the pack. The quicker way would be to
grind up the lump or chop it up into very fine bits and slowly mix it
with water. The key is to go slow-overhydrate and you get slip (which
has it’s own uses, actually.) Once it starts to form a lump, stop and
let the clay rest for a while, to allow time for the moisture to work
its way through the clay. You didn’t specify what type of PMC this
was. In general, PMC+ and PMC3 are a little more challenging to keep
moist and workable, as there is less binder. Standard, as there is
more binder, tends to retain a bit more moisture. In any event, it
should re-hydrate fairly easily. Another good tip, although I haven’t
actually tried this myself is to knead a small drop of glycerin into
the lump. This should help the clay retain moisture a little bit
better-but go easy on the glycerin just a drop should do the trick.


#4

Hi Sean,

It’s very easy, albeit time consuming, to rehydrate metal clay from
bone dry to perfectly creamy and usable. What I like to do is to use
a tissue blade or other sharp blade to chop the dry clay into the
tiniest bits you can (some folks use a coffee grinder or pepper
mill), transfer it to a mortar and pestle, grind it into powder, dump
the powder onto a glass surface and LIGHTLY spritz it with water
while mixing it with a spatula. When it is all incorporated and will
hold together, put it in a sheet of plastic wrap (I like Saran Wrap)
and knead it with your fingers - through the plastic. If it’s still a
little dry, dip your finger in water, wipe it across the clay and
knead it again - through the plastic (otherwise your fingers will
absorb most of the water). Then allow it to sit for at least a minute
or longer, up to overnight, so the binder has time to absorb the
water.

I’ve gotten the clay back to perfect every time using this method.
No lumps, no bumps.

To extend the working time of new, fresh clay add one drop of
glycerin to the lump and knead (through the plastic wrap). Let sit
for at least an hour and up to overnight. Glycerin retards the
evaporation of water and extends your working time.

Hope this helps. I know you’ll get other answers with other methods,
but I like this one best.

Lora


#5
actually tried this myself is to knead a small drop of glycerin
into the lump. This should help the clay retain moisture a little
bit 

It’s a real problem if you use too much glycerin – please dilute
your glycerin 50/50 with water.

Elaine

Elaine Luther
Metalsmith, Certified PMC Instructor
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools for Metal Clay