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Recreating a 19th Century Tsuba


#1

HI Guys,

Just found a way to spend 1/2 an hour.

This is a really interesting video, that shows the replicators
skill, but allows you to appreciate the creator of the original piece
who didn’t have a microscope.

I think we can all appreciate this.

http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/9c

Regards Charles A.


#2
I think we can all appreciate this. 

Ford Hallam is an amazing craftsman. It is great to see his work up
close

James Binnion
James Binnion Metal Arts


#3
This is a really interesting video, that shows the replicators
skill, but allows you to appreciate the creator of the original
piece who didn't have a microscope. 

This is more than interesting. Chasing at it’s best. It also shows
that even the most mundane steps are executed with great care and
precision. I think I need to go back and watch it second time.

Leonid Surpin
www.studioarete.com


#4

As well as being an awesome video and fascinating, it was a reminder
for me of how wonderfully interconnected the internet can make us.

Ford Hallam also makes netsuke and is/was part of another forum I
frequent. Not only is he a true master of his craft, he’s a very nice
guy. If any of you ever have a chance to study with him, jump on it!

Lindsay


#5
Ford Hallam is an amazing craftsman. It is great to see his work
up close 

He said he’d take an apprentice too, but you need a spare 5 years
:wink:

Personally, I’d go mad with that level of hand finishing… he’s
definitely someone to be admired.

Regards Charles A.


#6
skill, but allows you to appreciate the creator of the original
piece who didn't have a microscope. 

Absolutely riveting! I am in awe - of the craftsman, his mastery of
the processes, the finished tsuba utsushi and the original artist.

What a treat to see the execution of this fabulous re-creation.

Pam
in very breezy, Spring-y Mesa, AZ
www.songofthephoenix.com


#7

Is that lovely, even, large-button ‘ingot’ what came out, after
pouring the alloy into the water???

Janet in Jerusalem


#8

Was watching that video the other day. Really nice work, very
inspiring. I really liked the large ingot that he water-casts at the
beginning - it’s so close to the final shape that he wants.


#9

Hello All,

Wonderful set of videos and techniques Ford Hallam has there. There
are a few in the US who do similar work…one was taught a few
things by Ford, though neither of them would call it an
apprenticeship as it was not more than a few days…his name is
Patrick Hastings.

http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/a7

Patrick is teaching a five day class this April at my shop in
Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin.

http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/a8

The class is full, but as Patrick and his family are moving to
Wisconsin in the Fall it may be that more classes are offered in
2012…a rare opportunity to spend time learning techniques that are
not common these days. Class sizes are limited to six students.

Ric Furrer
doorcountyforgeworks.com