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Raising 80% coin silver to .925


#1

I asked this question some time ago and got very helpful replies. If
I remember correctly the formula that I should use is for each gram
of the80% coin silver I should add 1.7 grams of fine silver.
However, I lost my original notes, and I hope this is correct.

A customer has commissioned me to make her a bracelet using the some
Canadian quarters minted between 1949 and 1960. I tried to dissuade
her from insisting on my using these coins, but she says they have
sentimental value and wants me to raise the content to sterlingand
use them in casting bracelet for her.

She is a steady customer, and a friend, so reluctantly I said I
would do it, but I want to make sure about my calculations. To each
gram of the 80% coin silver, I should add 1.7 grams of fine. Is this
correct?

Would rather just use sterling grain, but now I am committed to
using the coins.

Alma


#2

Alma- If she really has sentimental feelings about these coins bezel
set them and make her a charm bracelet. No math needed.

Silver is not that expensive now. Why melt coins? Besides it’s
illegal to deface currency.

Have fun and make lots of jewelry.

Jo Haemer
timothywgreen.com


#3

Close enough. Actual would be .9259.

1 gram of 80% silver gives you 0.8 grams silver plus. 2 grams other.

Adding 1.7 grams silver gives you a total of 2.5 grams silver (0.8 +
1.7).

This also gives you 2.7 grams (2.5 + 0.2) total weight.

Silver percentage is 2.5/2.7 which is 0.9259.

Paul


#4

Hi Alma,

If I remember correctly the formula that I should use is for each
gram of the 80% coin silver I should add 1.7 grams of fine silver." 

Yes that is correct, you need 1.7 grams of fine silver for every
gram of 80% silver to make Sterling Silver

Regards
Milt
Calgary Canada


#5
Why melt coins? Besides it's illegal to deface currency. 

It’s only illegal for coins if the intent is to defraud. It’s
illegal for bills only if the intent is to make the bill “unfit to be
reissued.” As for melting, since 2006 it has been illegal to melt
pennies or nickels. You can melt silver coins if you want. In this
instance, I wouldn’t approve of it, but I’m not the customer.

Al Balmer


#6

Thanks for all the replies to my question on what percentage
silverto use to raise the value to .925. I don’t relish doing this
project with all the extra work involved, but my friend is
insistent. However, Jo has given me a real reason to decline
the project, and I will tell her that it is illegal to deface coins.

Hopefully, that will put an end to the matter.

Sometimes it is hard to work for friends. One does not want to hurt
their feelings, and often they just don’t have a clue as to what
their request involves.

Most are just wonderful to deal with, but once in a while some one
will make a request that is difficult to fulfill.

Thanks again for all the helpful responses. Alma


#7

The law states that as long as you are increasing the value of the
coin and not decreasing it you can do anything you want to do with
it…


#8

Vernon,

I am wondering which law you are referencing? As best as I can tell,
under Canadian law (the Currency Act s.11(1)), it’s illegal to melt
down Canadian coinage without a licence from the Minister of Finance.
Perhaps this is a difference of laws between different countries? Or
maybe there’s an ammendment I’m not familiar with? Of course, when I
contacted the Minister’s office when this topic came up last time
they indicated that a licence would be required (and that it was
unlikely to be granted except for perhaps pennies, since they’re now
out of circulation).

-Mark


#9

You guys are all way of topic. She just wanted to know what to add
for fine silver to raise it to. 925. I don’t think they care of its
legal or ethical of fattening.


#10
I am wondering which law you are referencing? As best as I can
tell, under Canadian law (the Currency Act s.11(1)), it's illegal
to melt down Canadian coinage without a licence from the Minister
of Finance. 

My apologies. I missed the initial post. My remarks were strictly
about US law.

Al Balmer


#11

U.S. Law. I used to know the exact section of the law as that is
how I got started into making jewelry almost 50 years ago. and was
asked all the time was it legal or not. Have not needed to use that
piece of info in 40 years so forgot the section numbers in the law
books.