Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

Quick polishing question


#1

Hello A very quick question…

I am reselling some jewellery I have bought at a trade show
(inexpensive coloured stones and silver), and I need to know if there
is a very quick and inexpensive way to polish off the manufacturer’s
hallmark?

Essentially, there is a very faintly inscribed signature by the
original manufacturer, and I would like to polish it off so my
clients don’t go direct and cut me out of my 20%.

All of the pieces are sterling silver…

Is there a quick and easy method to do this by? I do not currently
have access to any large polishing equipment, so something either by
hand or a dremel would be the extent that I could afford…

Any help or suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks
Michael


#2

Michael I suggest using a Dremmel, if you please with a pumice wheel,
of 180 grit. try using a flat surfaced edge or a fine edge if you
have to. there are no major clean-ups after wards…do not file, now
this will be a problem for you…pumice wheels is the ‘best’ method
for what you are looking for…Gerry, the Cyber-Setter!


#3

It looks like mandrel mounted rubber wheels/silicone polishers will
work for you. Depending on how deep the markings are, you may need to
do a two step process. Many jewelry tool supply companies sell
assorted kits. This way you can experiment and choose which
wheels/grit/polish would work best. Some silicone wheels leave a
bright polished surface.


#4

Of course you can fairly easily polish out the manufacturer’s
hallmark but there is a small ethical issue that arises here. Are
you then going to sell the product as your own? If so, you are
breaking all the rules about accurately representing your product.
Perhaps you ought to think about this first. And then not do it.

Daniel R. Spirer, GG
Spirer Somes Jewelers


#5

Extra Fine Cratex works well, I use it to remove miss done inside
ring engraving on occasions, it will certainly take out anything you
need to remove. The 5/8 round fit well in flex shafts. Be awair
that removing the trademarks has some legal ramifications.


#6
    I am reselling some jewellery I have bought at a trade show
(inexpensive coloured stones and silver), and I need to know if
there is a very quick and inexpensive way to polish off the
manufacturer's hallmark? Thanks Michael 

Hello Michael and who are you?

It’s a good thing you didn’t post this message on rec.crafts.jewelry
because I know a couple posters on that forum who’d be all over you
for that bright idea. Excuse me for being candid to the point of
blunt, but what you are suggesting is illegal, I think, and
unethical, I’m certain. One of the realities of being in business is
that the public is free to try and get a better price on your product
if anyone else has the right to market it. If you have a problem
competing with the manufacturer in the retail market, then you
shouldn’t be doing business with someone who doesn’t honor your right
to expect not to have your vendor wholesale to the public. You need
to learn more about the legalities of retail, as well as the ethics
of doing business in this country, before you end up in court with
someone suing the pants off you.

David L. Huffman


#7

Sounds illegal and unethical. I think you’re asking the wrong group
of people. What would you, if you’re a maker, think of someone
removing your mark. K Kelly


#8

Hello Michael; Don’t hang up . . .

You wrote:

 I need to know if there is a very quick and inexpensive way to
polish off the manufacturer's hallmark? Thanks Michael 

And I tore into you for it saying:

    It's a good thing you didn't post this message on
rec.crafts.jewelry because I know a couple posters on that forum
who'd be all over you for that bright idea. 

But I’ve re-read your post, and now I want to apologize. I didn’t
understand what you were asking, and I’m still not sure I
understand. You’re not intending to grind off the actual
manufacturers mark, but instead, some other mark that was added later
by the person you bought the pieces from, right? This is a peculiar
situation, and I’m sorry to accuse you of trying to thwart someone’s
copyright if that’s not what you want to do. What I don’t understand
is, why would someone add their own marking to an article
manufactured and marked by yet another company? Did they pull molds
and cast copies? That’s illegal, especially if there’s a copyright
mark. Are you confident that the articles are actually what they
are marked to be? I suppose you could grind off the second marking,
leaving the manufacturer’s mark intact, and still be legal. Unless
these are copies too, in which case, you’d be complicit in marketing
an illegally manufactured product. Can you clarify, and is there a
lawyer in the house? By the way, if the mark is faint, the cheapest
way to remove it is with 600 grit emery wrapped around a dowel stick,
then get some Flitz or Simichrome polishing paste from an auto supply
store, wrap a piece of old denim around a dowel, and buff it up.
Unless you wish to invest in a dremel tool and some miniature felt
buffs.

David L. Huffman


#9
    I am reselling some jewellery I have bought at a trade show
(inexpensive coloured stones and silver), and I need to know if
there is a very quick and inexpensive way to polish off the
manufacturer's hallmark? 

Shouldn’t be a problem. A file, a brightboy wheel, polishing
compounds, a flexible shaft or polishing lathe will help.

    Essentially, there is a very faintly inscribed signature by
the original manufacturer, and I would like to polish it off so my
clients don't go direct and cut me out of my 20%. 

How and why would they “cut” you "out of’ your “20%”? Didn’t you get
a good rate buying these in bulk? It’s not in their interest to cut
out any decent distributor. Do you really think that your customers
would have any idea where to go?They already made what they need for
their work, unless the works were stolen.

    All of the pieces are sterling silver..... 

How would you know? If they are stamped with a quality mark they will
probably need a manufacturers mark as well to indicate
responsibility.

    Is there a quick and easy method to do this by?  I do not
currently have access to any large polishing equipment, so
something either by hand or a dremel would be the extent that I
could afford....... 

Some brightboy wheels and soft or medium brushes with Fabuluster
should be okay for a short run.

Bruce D. Holmgrain
JA Certified Master Bench Jeweler


#10

Hi Michael, Forgive me for being so direct… maybe it’s just that
I’m a purist. Then again, perhaps it’s that I’m reading this posting
of yours from the sensitized perspective of an innovator – a poet,
musician, inventor, designer and craftsman – but I’m more than just
a little bit offended by your request for a way to eradicate all
evidence of someone else’s signature, in hopes that you can look
like you’re the originator of their workmanship and designs. What’s
more, it’s hard for me to fathom having the presence of mind to post
a request to an industry-wide list of fellow creative artists and
craftspeople, looking for an easy way to misrepresent work that
could very well be theirs (or mine) as your own, all for a 20%
profit (or any other, for that matter). I’m not saying this just to
pick a fight with you, but, frankly, I’m dumbfounded: I can’t even
begin to fathom a set of circumstances – that is, one which still
affords such affluent luxuries as a computer and internet access –
in which a profit margin would become more valuable to me than my
personal integrity, or a situation in which I’d not only want to rip
someone else off, but then send a letter to every last creative soul
in the trade, announcing that it was my intention to do so! I think
it was Tom Peters who once commented that, before we begin climbing
the ladder of success, it makes sense to take a look at what it is
that that ladder’s leaning on… Think about it, Michael: is the
miniscule 20% profit margin you’re hoping to make on those future
batches of inexpensive silver jewelry really worth all of the
long-term expense it’s likely to cost you? (Honestly, you couldn’t
pay me enough to do something like that.)

Douglas Turet


#11

What was the point again, of the original poster, for removing the
maker’s mark from these items before selling them? Maybe I missed
something, but…

Since the legal requirements are for any item bearing a metal purity
or content stamp to also have a maker’s mark or hallmark stamp, it
certainly seems irresponsible to remove it. I imagine that most of
the folks on this forum would also agree it doesn’t appear very
ethical either. I can’t imagine any instance where removing the
identification of authorship from any work, commercial or otherwise,
would be proper.

Michael David Sturlin
https://www.ganoksin.com/orchid/sturlin1.htm


#12
I can't imagine any instance where removing the identification of
authorship from any work, commercial or otherwise, would be proper. 

It is very common for retailers to use their own mark even though
they are not the manufacturer. It only means that they accrept
responsibility for the quality.


#13
  It is very common for retailers to use their own mark even
though they are not the manufacturer. It only means that they
accrept responsibility for the quality. 

Yes, but doesn’t the retailer leave the manufacturer’s mark on the
piece?

Jerry