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Question-difference between density and specific


#1

gravity
Sender: owner-orchid@ganoksin.com
Precedence: bulk

Jennifer, Theoretically, density and S.G. are the same only at 4,
because only at this temperature does 1 Cubic Centimeter (cc) of
water
weigh EXACTLY 1 gram. At any other temperature water weighs less
than
1 gram/cc. Lets take an example: Suppose you have an object that
weighs 80.000 grams and has a volume of 10.000 cc. The DENSITY is
80.000/10.000 8.000 However, at room temperature of say 25,
10.000
cc of water weighs only 9.971 grams, so the object’s S.G.
80.000/9.971 8.023. Another technical point (but maybe your teacher
wants you to know this), is that DENSITY has units i.e. mass/volume,
whereas S.G. has no units. it is a pure number. Hope this
helps. … Bob Williams


#2

gravity
Sender: owner-orchid@ganoksin.com
Precedence: bulk

Jennifer Specific gravity is the density of the object in question
divided by the density of water, both measured at 60 Degrees F. For
example if you determine that the density of your object is 60 #/ft3
You then look up the density of water at 60 F, which is about 62.4
#/ft3 The specific gravity of that object is about 0.962 (i.e.
60/62.4)

The metric system is a bit simpler as water has a density of about 1
gram per ml at 60 F. Therefore you always divide the density of your
object by 1 to get the specific gravity So if your object has a
density of 0.96 grams/ml, its specific gravity will also be 0.96
(i.e. 0.96/1)

Milt Fischbein
Calgary Alberta


#3

Jennifer, Theoretically, density and S.G. are the same only at 4,
because only at this temperature does 1 Cubic Centimeter (cc) of
water weigh EXACTLY 1 gram. At any other temperature water weighs less
than 1 gram/cc. Lets take an example: Suppose you have an object that
weighs 80.000 grams and has a volume of 10.000 cc. The DENSITY is
80.000/10.000 8.000 However, at room temperature of say 25, 10.000
cc of water weighs only 9.971 grams, so the object’s S.G.
80.000/9.971 8.023. Another technical point (but maybe your teacher
wants you to know this), is that DENSITY has units i.e. mass/volume,
whereas S.G. has no units. it is a pure number. Hope this
helps. … Bob Williams


#4

Jennifer Specific gravity is the density of the object in question
divided by the density of water, both measured at 60 Degrees F. For
example if you determine that the density of your object is 60 #/ft3
You then look up the density of water at 60 F, which is about 62.4
#/ft3 The specific gravity of that object is about 0.962 (i.e.
60/62.4)

The metric system is a bit simpler as water has a density of about 1
gram per ml at 60 F. Therefore you always divide the density of your
object by 1 to get the specific gravity So if your object has a
density of 0.96 grams/ml, its specific gravity will also be 0.96 (i.e.
0.96/1)

Milt Fischbein
Calgary Alberta