Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

Push Trouble


#1

The other day, a lady and her husband come into my shop from the
USA. They checked around and then they asked me if I make the
jewellery here.

Sure thing, I said, you want something made?

Well yes, they said, they want a piece of push jewellery made for
their daughter…

Push?

Okay, so the first thing that comes to mind is that the daughter
helped some one to push-start their car in a tough situation… Or
maybe she helped her husband push the furniture around in the living
room. You know, —I had, like man thoughts.

But it turns out that push jewellery is nothing like that. Push
jewellery is given to the woman giving birth.

Okaaaaay—, says I.

Now, to be sure, I know this list has a large population of the
gentler gender, and I for certain don’t want to tread on any feminist
toes in any manner.----( just covering myself)

But that is the first time I have ever heard of something like that.
And I thought that after some 28 years in the jewelery trade, I had
seen much of it.

After they left, I got to thinking about this thing called push
jewelery. What a great idea!

I mean, ---- How long was the push? (14ct to 18ct) Was it very
painful? (1 carat colour G vvs) In primitive conditions? ( Color D
with Tanzanites, 18ct.)

The possibilities are many, as well as being unisex.

His first kiss ( cast iron to 24ct— depending on who he kissed.)
---- to " I don’t know, babes, I’m not ready" ( 10ct piece of wire)
or to " I’ll phone daddy’s limo to take us to my hotel" ( 18ct plus a
2 carat, flawless, color change alexandrite.)

I think it should be called Momentous Jewelery.

Like your first car prang. Like your first near fatal parachute
jump. Like your first proper encounter with the opposite sex ( you
can’t remember?) And I am not talking about engagement rings and
wedding rings or birthday stuff, ok? ::::)) The possibilities are
endless.

And eventually, when you get old, then you’ll have this box of cool
jewelry, with all the reasons why you looking at them the first place

I have to ask, have any others made such things ? Like push
jewelery?

For a much more articulate article (after an internet search by my
wife,) go to

http://tinyurl.com/25axj4

Slightly bemused,

Hans Meevis.
http://www meevis.com


#2

Hans,

I’ve never heard it called push jewelry before but we regularly sell
pieces for women having babies. It is a pretty important time in
people’s lives and they like something to represent it. We have also
sold rings representing all kinds of things (first date, divorces,
you name it). Nothing new about it. Nothing wrong with it. Hey a long
time ago the rage was “mourning jewelry” on account of the queen
losing her consort. So what else is new?

Daniel R. Spirer, G.G.
Daniel R. Spirer Jewelers, LLC
1780 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02140
www.spirerjewelers.com


#3
I think it should be called Momentous Jewelery. 

Now this I like. =)

I think there are points in life that should be celebrated by the
creation of something precious, be it jewelry or something else. And
I really like the mental image of having a box of treasures as I grow
older to remind me of “the times”. And the birth of a baby is one of
those times.

But all in all… (If you want my $0.02USD)

“Push” jewelry, as such, is a crock.

The whole idea behind pushing is that you get a precious little baby
at the end of it. That is the reward. I know that often the father
gives the mother a token of recognition/affection/devotion
(flowers, simple jewelry, a book, a CD of music) after the birth of
the first child and sometimes after the second or third. But it
should be a simple gift from him to her. The idea that the woman is
getting expensive glitzy jewelry for pushing (and calling it “Push
Prizes”) really cheapens the significance of the event. It takes the
focus off the miracle of the baby. Besides what happens if she has a
C-section? Do they return the jewelry? Or do they give it to the
surgical team that pushes the baby out through the opening they
created?

Oy. Another scheme thought up by a female who decided that she
doesn’t have enough pricey jewelry. Good for our industry, but in
reality it is another tacky “keeping up with the Joneses” trend. And
I don’t see anything “sweet” with a pricey gift that the man is made
to feel like he “has” to give. Feels more like extortion. (So ya
ready for Valentine’s Day, guys?)

However… if it is what you want, I will make it for you.

Michelle

~ Yes I have two wonderful bouncing baby boys and yes my husband
gave me a token after the birth of our first son. The pricey jewelry
came for my 30th and the year I graduated with my M.S., had my
birthday and Mother’s Day all on the same weekend. =)


#4

Dear Hans,

Push jewelry is (excuse the pun) born from the natural childbirth and
midwife movement. One of the techniques to get past the pain of
contractions felt while giving birth is to visually focus on an
object while doing rhythmic breathing exercises.

Generally, the push item is plain and smooth like a 'worry stone.'
Perhaps some significant inscription could be engraved on it.
Anything complex or extravagant like a gemstone ring or pendant
could be stolen at the hospital or birthing center and would be
inappropriate. I was advised by my midwife to even leave my wedding
ring at home.

The lavish jewelry your describing is for a husband to buy his wife
after the child is born and both come through the ordeal alive and
healthy.

In more primitive cultures a woman surviving childbirth was the
equivalent of a warrior returning from battle and it was celebrated
as such.

Nanz Aalund
Associate Editor / Art Jewelry magazine
21027 Crossroads Circle / Waukesha WI 53187-1612
262.796.8776 ext.228


#5
The whole idea behind pushing is that you get a precious little
baby at the end of it. That is the reward. I know that often the
father gives the mother a _token_ of recognition/affection/devotion
(flowers, simple jewelry, a book, a CD of music) after the birth
of the first child and sometimes after the second or third. But it
should be a simple gift from him to her. The idea that the woman
is getting expensive glitzy jewelry for pushing (and calling it
"Push Prizes") really cheapens the significance of the event. It
takes the focus off the miracle of the baby. 

I have a different view from when I was pregnant with each of my two
sons. It was a lot of sacrifice for me to give my fit body over to
this force that could not be swayed. I had medical complications
beyond my control during both pregnancies that required exclusive
bedrest over the last 6 weeks or so (which was a real sacrifice for a
doer like me). I gave up all caffeine & alcohol and made sure I only
ate healthy things. I didn’t care if I had a natural or C-section
delivery but we all felt like I deserved a reward for my efforts.
Yes, healthy babies are a reward and I breast fed both of them for
more than a year. My husband gave me a string of Mikimoto pearls for
my first son and I picked out a fairly expensive solid mahogany
sleigh bed (for us) for my second son. I consider the “pushing” part
(both required more than 12 hours each of that) minor in comparison
to all the other sacrifices I made to bring healthy children into
this world. At the time, we called them “my present for Tom”, and
later Sam.

Just another view…

Elizabeth
www.borntobeworn.com


#6

At one time it was popular with the younger crowed to give these
little rings with a very little diamond in it. We jokingly called
them F.F. rings. I guess you could call them push jewelry.


#7

Hello All,

I know that I segway, but the comment regarding F.F. Rings (and what
ever does that mean…I’m almost afraid to ask!) reminds me of the
ring with a very tiny diamond my husband gave me as a “promise” ring
while we were still in college. He called it the “cannardly” 'cause
one could hardly see it!

Susan Ronan
Coronado, CA
Http;//www.susanronanstudio.com


#8

When I had my two children, many years ago before I started making
jewelry, I bought myself a ring to commemorate each occasion. I
still love those pieces and cherish their memories.

Now that I occasionally make jewelry for myself, each piece I make
for myself is imbued with some meaning; a season, a loved one, an
emotion. They are not so much ornaments as talismans.

I’d like to think that at least some of the people who buy and wear
my work think of it that way.

The term push jewelry is pretty cynical, but at its heart is
something true: life’s occasions, great and small, deserve to be
commemorated.

Janet Kofoed
http://users.rcn.com/kkofoed