Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

Producing Silver with Golden color


#1

Dear all,

I know this will be the million dollar question: Is there a way to
produce Sterling silver with golden color (similar to 18K or a
somewhat near to an antique look yellow) I mean as in mixing alloys,
or other metal with Silver

As far as I know, there isn’t a way yet but I could be sleeping for
few years and such process has been created!! Who knows! Are we in
2008??? :-).

Also, if there is any technique that will help in giving the silver
such color, beside plating, maybe there is a way such as Acid itching
or gilding!!

Any help will be greatly appreciated, thank you all in advance.

Best regards
Dikran Nodznaia


#2

Dikran:

Is there a way to produce Sterling silver with golden color
(similar to 18K or a somewhat near to an antique look yellow) I mean
as in mixing alloys, or other metal with Silver 

If you’re not stuck on sterling, try Red Brass. Easy to work and
polishes to look like gold (of course it tarnishes again after a
while). Also sold as Nu-Gold, Jeweler’s Bronze, etc. Many industry
suppliers sell some sheet and wire and SFJS has bezel wire,
half-round, etc. at

http://www.sfjssantafe.com/MetalsList.php?ItemSet=Red+Brass&DepId

Jamie


#3

Dikran,

There are several ways to produce a piece that is silver (or
primarily silver) but has a lovely golden color.

  1. Patina: A liver of sulphur patina, done room temperature, slows
    down the reaction enough to stop it at gold, rose gold, etc. It’s
    quite durable over time (I’ve had pieces that were done 10 years ago
    that haven’t changed a bit in color). Can also be re-done if needed.
    As you’re not going for an iridescent color, you can seal the gold
    patina with a clear lacquer or wax for added durability.

  2. Keum Boo: In this technique, you first raise the fine silver to
    the surface of the sterling (or you can just use fine silver if
    appropriate for the piece), then fuse a thin layer of gold foil
    (usually 22K or 24K) to the surface of the silver. You can use
    multiple layers if you wish to deepen the color even more. I don’t
    recommend using gold leaf for this - just too thin for control and
    you won’t get the color you’re looking for.

3, 18K/925 bi-metal: You can either create your own by fusing a
layer of 18K gold to a thicker layer of sterling, or you can purchase
sheet already fused (try hauser and miller for excellent quality).
The gold layer is much thinner than the silver layer, so you achieve
the look of gold without the cost.

I hope one of these techniques is what you’re looking for!

Karen Goeller
No Limitations Designs
Hand-made, one-of-a-kind jewelry