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Prismacolors on copper


#1

In the archives, there is an article originally printed by LJ about
a technique used by Deb Karash that utilizes Prismacolor colored
pencils with textured, patinated copper. The article touches on this
technique, but claims that Deb Karash uses a 30-step process to
color and seal with a fixative. I’m very interested in this
technique, does anyone have more about the process? I’d
like to know more about the other 28 steps. Here’s a link to the
article on Ganoksin:

Thanks in advance,
James in SoFl


#2

Hallo James,

Have you seen the book, “Color on Metal” by Tim McCreight and Nicole
Bsullak? There are some fabulous ways of colouring metal presented
although no work from Deb Karash. There is however a section on the
work of Helen Shirk who also uses Prismacolor, Page 107-108.

Cheers, Jenny.
Jenny Gore Enamels
Adelaide, South Australia

Color on Metal: 50 Artists Share Insights and Techniques
By Tim McCreight , Nicole Bsullak


Price: $18.90

Media: Hardcover
Manufacturer: Guild Publishing
Release data: 01 April, 2001


#3

Huh. 30 steps? We did this in a workshop, and there were only
like, 5 steps.

  1. Sandblast metal. If you don’t have a sandblaster, sand with rough
    sandpaper

  2. Color with Prismacolors

  3. Prepare Liver of Sulphur, very concentrated, put it in a Pyrex
    dish on a heat coil

  4. Dunk your colored piece of metal

  5. Ta Da!

  6. Seal with your choice of stuff – spray on, or wax

Elaine
Elaine Luther
Metalsmith, Certified PMC Instructor
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools for Metal Clay


#4

Me too, me too! I could draw my art directly on items. Heh that
would be very cool. Let me know if you find out the steps please!

Teri
America’s Only Cameo Artist
www.cameoartist.com


#5

While wandering through the archives I found the email from James in
SoFL.

https://orchid.ganoksin.com/t/prismacolors-on-copper
In the archives, there is an article originally printed by LJ
about a technique used by Deb Karash that utilizes Prismacolor
colored Pencils with textured, patinated copper. The article
touches on this Technique, but claims that Deb Karash uses a
30-step process to Color and seal with a fixative. I'm very
interested in this Technique, does anyone have more information
about the process? I'd Like to know more about the other 28 steps.
Here's a link to the Article on Ganoksin: 
http://www.ganoksin.com/borisat/nenam/coloring-for-metalsmiths.htm

Did anyone find out what the other 28 steps are? I have been wanting
to do this since I saw Helen Shirk’s work several years ago. I asked
a meta ls Instructor about the book by Tim McCreight and was told
that some steps w ere incomplete. I find that hard to believe since I
have used McCreight’s books for over 15 years and metal-working
people are usually glad to share their experiences. Maybe I should
just go to trial and error.

Thanks to all of you,
Bobbie


#6

There is also an article in the June 2007 Lapidary Journal. They
recommend using turpentine in between the coloring layers.

I just finished teaching a class on this for our metals group. This
is what we did:

Patina the copper (I used horse-urine soaked sawdust).

Clean the metal up with soap and water and let it dry thoroughly.

Apply the colored pencil using the well-patinated areas of the
copper.

Using a cotton ball, dab turpentine onto the colored area. Let dry
completely.

Continue coloring./turps until you are “happy” with the result.

Spray with a matte sealer (we used Krylon) and set.

We did NOT get the kind of color density that you see in the Deb
Karash material but we did OK. Drawing and blending colors (and
shading) worked well. I made a piece copying some prehistoric cave
art and it came out well with the details noticeable.

Debby


#7

If memory serves (and how often I wish it still did!), I believe
there was a section describing some color techniqes in The Penland
Book of Jewelry: Master Classes in Jewelry Techniques (Hardcover) by
Lark Books.

Good Luck!
Lisa Weber


#8

The book “The Penland Book of Jewelry” does go into detail about use
of colored pencil on metal. It is a quite involved process that
includes applying liver of sulpher first, than gesso, than the
pencil and finally a coating. There are variables too e.g. making
sure the gesso is set, making sure the metal has some tooth before
applying. I would reccommend buying or borrowing this book. Besides
giving a great step by step procedure with instructions and pictures
to this procedure it also details alot of other useful procedures
needed in the making of metals.

Hope this helps,
Linda Reboh
of Cosmic Creations


#9
The book "The Penland Book of Jewelry" does go into detail about
use of colored pencil on metal. 

I will look for thebook. The pieces I saw were beautiful. I have no
idea how many times I went back to view the exhibit.

Bobbie