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Price Tag Alternatives


#1

I have been reading some of the archived price tag threads with
great interest. I like to clearly display the prices of my pieces.
However, I would like to come up with an alternative to the hanging
paper tags I have been using. Attaching them with thread has caused
awful tangles, and tiny safety pins have proven unsightly. The
stickers I have placed on the backs are not visible to curious
customers. I would love an option that is remniscent of a gallery,
but something which packs easily for shows. I have been thinking of
a sort of small gallery card next to each piece, with a short
description and price, but these easily become separated from their
pieces during pack up/transport.

Among those who display prices, how do you accomplish that with an
upscale look?


#2

Interesting that this topic should reappear at this time. I had a
customer bring me a pair of die struck, machine welded, earrings she
bought at a local retailer. The price tag was still in the box. One
of those little kind of tags that fits between the liner and the box
and sticks up so nice and pretty displaying the price for all to see.
The outrageous price I might add. I threw these bad boys on the scale
just to see what they weighed. 1.7grams of the finest 14kt yellow
gold. I say the finest cause it must be really good stuff priced at
$164.00. That is $96.47 per gram for 14kt machine made gold. So next
time you are wondering where to put the price tag on your hand made,
one of a kind, exclusive design pieces, and what $ amount to put on
it. Remember, be bold. The big boys have no shame and look what they
are doing… OK so I don’t know what she actually paid maybe they were
on sale for say 40% or 50% off. Still not a bad profit margin…
Food for thought for the holidays.

Frank Goss


#3
Among those who display prices, how do you accomplish that with an
upscale look? 

I have the price of each item (printed on transparent label tape) on
a 1/2" transparent plastic cube. I group individual items in the
same price category with the cube centrally located. I’ve seen that
people who don’t notice the system will ask about price and when I
explain the cubes, they go on a tour of my cases to check out the
cube discovery. When I pack up, I toss the cube into the item’s
plastic bag so everything stays together until the next show. It’s
easy and unobtrusive.

Donna in VA


#4
Among those who display prices, how do you accomplish that with an
upscale look? 

Personally I dont display prices, but what has worked well for me
recently is acquiring a small portable label printer from your local
office supply store, they run about $20. The print tape is 1/2"
wide, I use the clear tape, and set the font to small. From there
you simply print the price (or in my case inventory number) then trim
with scissors. This gives you a label thats about 1/8" tall and not
very wide. Simply stick it in a place on the jewelry thats
convenient for you. The clear tape isnt quite clear but provides a
clean label that will remove easily, and is very discreet.

Using inventory numbers lets me carry a pricelist seperately for both
retail and wholesale.

Good Luck,
P@
www.patpruitt.com


#5
Among those who display prices, how do you accomplish that with an
upscale look? 

This continues to be one of those unsolvable problems. People don’t
like to ask prices, but displaying them is awkward or ugly.

My own solution (so far, anyway), after many different attempts, is
to use the little snap-together numbers. I use white on black, as my
displays are all black. They are relatively unobtrusive but easily
legible. The drawbacks are that they have to be set out at each show
beside each piece, which takes about 10 minutes, and, I’ve had to
start using odd pricing like $392 because I don’t have enough zeros
or fives. On the other hand, prices are very easy to change.

I am convinced that customers like to see what things cost without
asking. Given the slightest opportunity, I will put the piece in
their hands. I wish it were not necessary to put things in cases,
but it is. I believe (hope) that I gain more sales by not forcing
people to talk with me before they learn the cost of a piece than I
lose from people not falling in love with pieces before they know
how much they will have to pay for them… Follow that? Gold star!

Noel


#6

I don’t know if my tags are upscale or not, but they are tidy. I had
business cards printed vertical with 4 sets of My name,
email and phone is what I had put on the cards… I cut the cards
into 4 pieces, punched a hole in the side. (I made sure there was
enough space so the hole didn’t invade the ) Then I got
myself a dymo label thing to hook to my computer. I print the info I
want on each piece and stick it on the backs of the mini-cards. I did
not think the card idea up myself, I found it on somebody else’s
on the net. I did decide the dymo labels were cool
myself. Each buyer has your business info hooked right to the
purchase. I stick the necklace chain through the tag hole, the
bracelet clasp through, etc. I do not have a good idea for tagging
rings though other than the little circle button tags.

Jean


#7
I am convinced that customers like to see what things cost without
asking. 

Exactly, people like to know what to expect. Like you don’t want to
go into a restaurant you can’t see into through the window.

There was a restaurant near me, totally new and remodeled, went from
a diner to an upscale bistro, and they had these stylish,
somethings, I really don’t know what they were, that covered the
windows almost entirely.

You couldn’t see in. And this was in a gentrifying area, people
wanted to know what to expect.

They ended up changing the stylish, whatever they weres, so that you
could see in. Business improved for a while but now it’s a rib
joint.

Elaine
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools for Metal Clay


#8
When I pack up, I toss the cube into the item's plastic bag so
everything stays together until the next show. It's easy and
unobtrusive. 

Could you post a picture of it? email it to service@ganoksin.com.

Elaine
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools for Metal Clay


#9
1.7grams of the finest 14kt yellow gold. I say the finest
cause it must be really good stuff priced at $164.00. Still not a
bad profit margin.... 

Ok here we go again. Let’s see if everyone can understand the costs
that go into selling a piece of jewelry. Let’s assume, for argument’s
sake, that the manufacturer of the piece is able to take his $25
worth of metal (1.1 dwt of 14k gold @ approximately 25/dwt.—I don’t
know the exact price right now because I buy primarily 18k, but my
18k is running about $33/dwt right now in wire or sheet form), stock
it, stamp it out on his machinery (machinery costs money to invest in
to begin with and to finance), produce a catalog from which to sell
the piece, pay his salesman a commission on the piece, pay for his
heating, cooling, phone, labor (oh and by the way it’s nice to have a
little profit too so that he can buy a new machine when the old one
breaks down) etc. and by some miracle after all this, is able to sell
the piece for $55 to the retailer.

That would then assume that the retailer is running a triple key
markup (300%). Sounds high right? Alright, let’s look at that too.
The retailer has to pay shipping to get the piece to his store.
Someone has to log in the piece (usually into some computer system
which means it helps to have some familiarity with the programs),
price it and put it out in the case (all labor that has to be paid
for). Let’s assume it’s a hot seller, so they don’t have to sit on it
for more than a week (remember, every penny tied up in merchandise
that isn’t selling is costing you money). But in order to sell it
quickly they have to have enough customers coming in the store. Ok
that means they have to advertise (advertising is usually pegged at
about 5% of sales–that’s 5% of the gross price, not the markup).
Then they have to have staff that actually has to sell the piece. I
don’t know about you, but usually it takes more than 5 minutes for
any of my customers to get in and out of the store. So let’s assume
it takes a half hour of labor to actually sell the piece, get it
written up, boxed up (oh boxes—they cost money too–mine cost me
between $5-12 apiece although they’re probably better than most),
wrapped, etc. Oh and then you have to take their credit card. Credit
card fees----1.7-3.5% (that is 1.7-3.5% of the gross price, not the
markup) of each sale. On top of that, if you have a sales staff of
more than a few people, you also need a manager to manage them. They
have to be paid. If you’re a mall store you have to pay a percentage
of each sale to the mall. Of course you also have to pay rent, phone,
electricity, heating, stationary costs, cleaning (someone has to
actually clean the store on a regular basis), computer upgrade
costs, and yes, you also have to figure in the costs of the rather
normal pilferage that occurs over time in most shops (not to mention
things just disappearing because stuff does sometime just get lost),
oh and then there’s insurance (mine is over $5000 annually and I’m
not a huge store), oops and I forgot the owner actually has to make
some money on his initial investment, plus actually earn a living.
After reading all of this do you honestly think that making $109 on a
piece of jewelry that cost $55 is excessive??? In fact they’re
actually probably losing money on this piece and trying to make up
for it on the higher priced items.

These types of thoughts are another prime example of the
WalMartization of America. Everyone assumes that if something costs
you $100 to buy, then you should be happy reselling it for $105
because they think you’re making a profit. That’s great if you’re Wal
Mart and have the buying power and selling power that they do. But
for the rest of us poor slobs out there, it just doesn’t work that
way.

Daniel R. Spirer, G.G.
Daniel R. Spirer Jewelers, LLC
1780 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02140
www.spirerjewelers.com


#10

Jean - use the same tag with a short piece of embroidery thread.

Judy Shaw


#11

There are some great ideas here to try. I’ll be picking up a label
maker this week, and I’ll check out the clear labels.

Donna, where do you get these little transparent cubes? Sounds
intriguing.

Lisa Weber


#12

I have gone through the delima for years I came up with grouping my
jewelry by types say stering earrings. I did a small sign for example
at the earrings saying sterling silver earrings 40.00 to 100.00 it
cuts down on the clutter but gives a general idea for the majority of
the pieces. The one thing I notice however is that instead of asking
about a piece they ask where the 40.00 earrings are.

Dave Owen


#13
Exactly, people like to know what to expect. Like you don't want
to go into a restaurant you can't see into through the window. 

This is a digression, but this is evidently a culturally determined
thing (reaction to price tags probably is as well-- representatives
of non-English-speaking cultures?). I am told that Asians do not
like to be looked in at while eating and therefore prefer
restaurants without picture windows. There is a Korean place near me
(named Mandarin House, go figure) that I didn’t try for many years
because I could not see in. My loss. We don’t mind bars we can’t see
into, evidently.

Can’t see any way to make this shed light, unfortunately.

Noel


#14

Donna, where do you get these little transparent cubes? Sounds
intriguing.

I get them at a place (Read Plastics) in Rockville, MD which sells
all sorts of Delrin and plastic sheet. It looks industrial and sells
transparent cylindars and cubes in sizes from 2" down. Denver had a
place like that, Cadillac Plastics. Look in the yellow pages.

Donna in VA


#15
I have the price of each item (printed on transparent label tape)
on a 1/2" transparent plastic cube. 

Donna, where do you get these little plastic cubes?

Lisa
Designs by Lisa Gallagher
www.lisagallagher.com


#16
Exactly, people like to know what to expect. Like you don't want
to go into a restaurant you can't see into through the window. 

Interesting, it probably is culturally based. personally, if I am
curious about a restaurant, I often stop in to look over the menu,
and get a feel for the fare and the price range. Lack of windows (or
window coverings) would not be likely to stop me. However, a menu
without prices would stop me cold. I would immediately assume that
is is not in my price range. After all, what’s the big secret? If
you want me to buy your food, you must tell me how much I can expect
to pay before I will allow myself to become interested. To me,
anything else smacks of snobbery and game-playing, and I am
immediately uncomfortable.

I shop for jewelry and other quality crafts the same way. Price is
of integral importance to me, and I always look for the price to see
if I am wasting my time on something that may be lovely, but out of
my reach. If I don’t know that a piece might be in or near my range,
I will be likely to move on without ever asking. If someone wants to
sell something to ME, clearly visible prices make the experience so
much more comfortable for both of us. I despise the contortions I
have to go through to see prices reflected in mirrors or under
shelves. Trying to have prices available without looking cluttered,
though… that’s harder to pull off.

Great ideas coming along. I’d love to hear more!

Lisa Weber
Silver Vine Jewelry