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Presentation boxes/packing foam?


#1

Hi Folks,

Last year I made three one-of-a-kind sterling belt buckles. They’ve been
in the gallery for a while, and much to my surprise (and dismay), they
haven’t sold. They are currently displayed on a belt mock-up I made, so
people will know what they are.

I’ve been toying with the idea of making or getting some nice wooden boxes
for them. I’d like to fill the box with some sort of foam (with a fabric
sheet on top)that would conform to the buckle then cure to a somewhat
pliable form… kind of making a molded recepticle.

My questions are: does anyone know of a kind of foam that can be poured
and cures like this? Any ideas for suppliers of “keepsake” quality wooden
boxes?

Many thanks,

Dave Sebaste
Sebaste Studio
Charlotte, NC


#2

Dave,

There’s a kind of foam that is sold in aerosol cans (size of
large can of Pam) in hardware or building supply stores. It is
used to fill in defects or holes where pipes come into the house,
around electrical outlets, etc. I guess you could just spray it
into your box, put the fabric on top of it, and then press your
buckle into it. Then you could take it out when it is cured, and
wrap the fabric around it neatly. The can costs between
$5-6.00, so it wouldn’t be expensive to try it out. I’ll look in
some of my catalogues for some wooden boxes. What size would you
like? Ruth


#3

I have used a material to do stuff similar to what you speak of. It is a
spay foam insulation material that comes in a can, same size as a standard
spray paint can. You ca get it at most any home place or hardware store. It
does expand a little so you may have to experiment with it. Some of this
stuff sprayed into small plastic bags and put around things that are
fragile make a great way to ship that kind of stuff in the mail. It forms
around the object and takes the shape of the box too.


#4

Thanks for your suggestions, Ruth and Dave! I’ll have to look into the
aerosol foam stuff. It sure sounds like what I’m looking for. The inside
dimenstions of the box(es) should be somewhere around 4" long, 3.5-4" wide,
and maybe 1.5" deep. I suppose I could make them myself… although a
table saw and corner clamps would help! Any sources for exotic wood?

Dave Sebaste


#5

If you’re interested in making them, or at least custom finishing the
interior, Lee Valley Tools (good source for some other useable tools on
the bench), have a felt application kit. Provided you have a molded bottom
to hold the buckle, you apply glue and “powdered” felt to the interior of
the box with a small applicator. Has worked great for small keepsake boxes
with a flat interior, but would be no problem with a molded one. They are
at:

Lee Valley Tools Ltd. (613) 596-0350
P.O. Box 6295, Station J (800) 267-8767
Ottawa, Ont. (613) 596-6030 - FAX
K2A 1T4 Mon-Thurs 9-6, Fri 9-9, Sat 9-5

"Fine woodworking tools. Several stores. They have a main catalogue, a
couple of supplements a year, and a hardware catalogue, Even if you don’t
understand tools at all, the main catalogue is worthwhile getting as a
coffee table book: glossy paper and beautiful presentation. They have
everything from instrument-maker’s to log builder’s hand tools.

I don’t have any special interest in the company other than a happy
customer.

Hope this helps.

kurcb@poboxes.com

" Give me ambiguity… or give me something. "


#6

you apply glue and “powdered” felt to the interior of
the box with a small applicator.

Wow… I can hardly believe it. I’ve been looking for something to
refinish some displays and couldn’t find anything. This may be it. You know
how the neck forms get worn looking, I want to make them look nice again.
Guess I’m too cheap to throw them out!

Sandi

Sundries for soapers gift baskets , BOTTLES & JARS
Some bottles perfect for beading!
LIFE IS GOOD!


#7

I would like to take this opportunity to warn any of you contemplating
working wood in the same location as you do your jewelry- you are “playing
with fire.” Saw dust in the right proportions to the air can explode, as
well as catch on fire. I’ve worked for a number of years as a wood worker,
before I got into metal, and I have seen fires, even explosions from an
electric motor. (at the time I thought it was pretty cool, now I think I
was just lucky) When working in laquer, varnish, linseed oils, etc. can
leave vapors in the air 8-12 hours after you think you can’t smell them
anymore. I’d hate to see what that would do to your studio. One friend of
mine lost his shop because he used a stain that reacted unfavorably to a
commonly used petroleum product, it “spontaneously combusted”. Now don’t get
me wrong. I’m all for self-sufficient life, I’m just saying, do your
woodwork in one area, and your metal in another. Tim Goodwin
@tmn8tr

-remember, today’s our “Flexible Shaft” day! (taxes)


#8

On 15-Apr-97, David Sebaste wrote aboutRE: Presentation boxes/packing foam?:

DS> The inside dimenstions of the box(es) should be somewhere around 4" long,
DS>3.5-4" wide, and maybe 1.5" deep. I suppose I could make them myself…
DS>although a table saw and corner clamps would help! Any sources for exotic wood?
DS> Dave Sebaste

G’day Dave. You might like to talk to a jobbing woodworker
about making your boxes from exotic woods; I am sure there will
be a a Woodworker’s or Woodturner’s Club somewhere in your
vicinity. I am a member of the Nelson Guild of Woodworkers and I
know there are several of our members who would be interested -
but we are much too far away from you. I like to present my
jewellery in little lidded boxes, which I turn up myself from
some of our native timbers. But do try a local club. Cheers,

        /\
       / /    John Burgess, 
      / /
     / //\    @John_Burgess2
    / / \ \
   / (___) \
  (_________)

#9

If you have a bandsaw, it is easy to make curvey bandsaw boxes.They can be
held together with heavy rubber bands while the glue sets up.Simply saw
out a nice cube or whatever that is the right size. Saw a slice off of all
six sides. Glue the slices back together. When the glue is cured, saw off
enought of the top to make a lid. Glue strips on inside of the lid to make
a lip that will hold the lid in place. They can be fun if you have a
decent bandsaw. Marilyn Smith


#10

Lee Valley Tools (good source for some other useable tools on
the bench), have a felt application kit.

Hi Kurc, the felt application kit (called “Suede-Tex” Flocking Kit) is
available from Woodcraft also (stock number 14X10 price is $67.99). I once
turned a box for a bracelet that was made by a girl as a journeyman’s
piece. The wood I used was Jarrah burr, and as a "bed for the bracelet I
used a technique called French fitting: The outline of the bracelet was
sawn (with a jewellers saw and a Sawblade for wood) out of a disc of wood
that fitted inside the box neatly. I had two “bridges” left to connect the
inner part (where the arm passes through) and the outer part. These
bridges were cut away half from the underside, and the connected parts
glued to another disc of the same diameter. The bridges were cut away when
the glue had set, leaving a sort of dado into which the bracelet fitted
exactly. This dado I covered with the Suede-Tex. One cuold easily adapt
this to other forms of boxes, square, rectangular, oval, fancy. When
keeping small, e.g. for rings etc., you wouldn’t even need special
woodworking tools to make these boxes, but get along with jeweller’s tools
(beware of the fire hazard!).

Woodcraft Supply Corp.
210 Wood County Industrial Park
PO Box 1686
Parkersburg, WV 26102-1686
1-800-225-1153

They also sell wood including exotics, but I have no clue whether prices
are low or high, as I use mostly homegrown fruitwood, which can be as
stunning as any rainforest timber - and I get it most often for the
taking. regards, Markus