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Powdered red rouge


#1

I’ve recently read in a jewelers construction book by Madeline Cole
of a material called powdered red rouge. It is used like yellow
ochre. The powdered red rouge is mixed with a small amount of
denatured alcohol to form a paste that has an oil base unlike yellow
ochre. I’ve used yellow ochre for years and dislike it, and would
like to try this powdered red rouge if anyone knows where it might
be obtained. I’ve thought of trying to “grate” some from my bar of
red rouge:however, I’ve been unable to find a grater with small
enough holes to give me a fine powder. Any help would be greatly
appreciated. I’ve looked in Rio Grande, Indian Jewelers Supply, and
Thunderbird, all to no avail. Best wishes to all, John Barton


#2

John, Some years ago I bought (and still have) a can (about 2 lbs) of
powdered red rouge from Sears. Not sure they still have it but if
you cannot find any, give me a hoot off line and (if I can find the
can) will send you some.

Cheers from Don at The Charles Belle Studio where simple elegance IS
fine jewelry! @coralnut


#3

I believe what your looking for is a oil-based polishing compound
that comes in a stick. Theres also a water based one, thats
probable not what you want. I don’t think that it comes in a powder
form, but you could easily chip some off to use to make a paste. I
used to use a small amount of machine oil, the one that comes in a
small rectangular old-fashioned can(cant think of the name). It
worked well if the joint was not touching the new solder
joint. It s the oil that prevents the solder from flowing. Good luck.


#4

John, You can find the powdered red rouge or powdered ocher at any
decent art supply house prepared as a pigment for paint. However, if
you take a paint brush and dip it in water/alcohol you can dab it on
any water soluble stick of red rouge and paint the rouge on your
piece. Good luck.

John Sholl


#5
I've recently read in a jewelers construction book by Madeline
Cole of a material called powdered red rouge.  It is used like
yellow ochre. The powdered red rouge is mixed with a small amount
of denatured alcohol to form a paste that has an oil base unlike
yellow ochre. 

If you’re using the yellow ochre to protect an earlier solder or to
prevent solder from flowing where you don’t want it, why not try
White Out? (Yeah, the same stuff in a bottle the secretary uses to
correct typing mistakes.) It works great and the bottle has an
application brush included. Neat and easy.

Regards, Laurie


#6

Here’s how to make rouge powder from rouge block.

1 Roughly grate the block into a conyainer.

2 Add about five times the amount of a grease solvenmt such as
turpentine.

3 when its all dissolved add ten times the amount of water and a
good splash of detergent (dish cleaner)

4 Filter the powder out.

Rouge block is only the iron oxide powder bonded into hard grease.

If you want to use the powder for a polish - dont! It will fly
everywhere off the wheel!

If you want to use it as a solder inhibitor just rub a paintbrush
dipped in turps onto the block!

Tony


#7

John, I actually asked one of my instructors about this technique
recently. ALthough I have not yet tried it you might have some luck
using a mortar and pestle (like for grinding herbs/nuts etc) to make
the rouge into a fine powder.

Also, as odd as it sounds, try plain old white toothpaste (not the
gel kind) it works well.

Out here in Singapore we get very creative with tools.

cheers-
Carree


#8
powdered red rouge.  It is used like yellow ochre. 

Hi John, I moved away from yellow ochre as an anti-flux several years
ago. My primary concern was pickle contamination, since the stuff is
essentially an iron oxide. I suspect a red rouge powder would have
the same drawback… eventually turning your pickle bath into a
copper plating facility. As an alternative, I’ve been using water
based Wite-Out (typing correction fluid). The water based one may be
a little more difficult to find, but reduces toxic fume exposure. As
an “added extra bonus”, it comes with an applicator brush built into
the cap! If it dries out (which mine does about once a year), just
add a few drops of water and reconstitute it!

All the best,
Dave
Dave Sebaste
Sebaste Studio and
Carolina Artisans’ Gallery
Charlotte, NC (USA)
dave@sebaste.com


#9

Hi John, Actually, plain old pencil lead that’s been scraped or
crushed into a fine powder will work also.

Dave


#10
would like to try this powdered red rouge if anyone knows where it
might be obtained. I've thought of trying to "grate" some from my
bar of red rouge:however, I've been unable to find a grater with
small enough holes to give me a fine powder. 

I used to use the red rouge bar which I rubbed with a solvent
(alcohol might work) using a small paint brush and then applying the
solution to the area. If you want to get a finer powder use an old
file instead of a grater and collect the filings onto a paper and
then store in a container. Use this to mix with your solvent.
Finally, you can buy powdered rouge from many suppliers who use the
Grobet catalog. For example: T.B. Hagstoz & Son in Philly - 800
922-1006 or A&M Supplies tel: 1 212 869 1229. HTH J.Z. Dule


#11

I have used clay such as potters use to stop solder flow. After all,
we all know that solder doesn’t flow into dirty areas.

Marilyn Smith


#12

John, this is probably not the same stuff at all. I know what red
rouge is. But it’s the only thing I can think of. Crazy Crow is an
Indian supplier out of Pottsboro, Tx. They have powdered Indian
paint. Real Indian paint is from rocks, which we still use to this
day to paint ourselves with, or to paint an “old style” hide
painting, etc. You’re probably getting a joke from this one, but
it’s the only thing I could think of!

Sharon Perdasofpy