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Polishing Sapphire


#1

Hi

I have a blue sapphire that needs to be cleaned up. I am unsure
as to whether or not it is a real sapphire. My customer seems
to think that the sapphire is not synthetic. She purchased the
ring with the sapphire set in a filigree gold and platinum
setting with two diamonds set on either side of the sapphire
about 50 years ago. The sapphire is 6mm X 6mm square (rounded
edges) She wants to keep the stone for sentimental reasons.

Basically, I need to find out if it is worth cleaning the
sapphire up. The sapphire has scratches on the face and it looks
as though some of the facets need to be cleaned up. (Of course I
have no idea of what I am talking about) I need someone who
does cutting and faceting of colored gemstones to help me.
Please email me off Orchid.

Thank you!

Thank you.
Linda Crawford
Linda Crawford Designs
http://www.jps.net/lcrawford
@Linda_Crawford
Willits, CA, USA
"It’s never to late to be what you might have been."
–George Elliot


#2

Hello Linda,

If the stone has sentimental value the origin is moot. To a
cutter a sapphire crown repolish is equally time and supply
consuming whether it be synthetic or natural. Without a loupe the
colour is the first clue for possible man made origin. Nobody
synthesises off colour or zoned sapphires nor blue sapphires that
are tinged green when viewed girdle on.

I disagree with you. You do know what you are talking about, you
were able to see and discern the problem, you are correct it
needs repolishing. I charge my customers $30-35 for this type of
work, US$20-25.

I would suggest you contact your local lapidary, faceters, or
rockhound clubs for a convenient cutter near you, many amateur
cutters take on commercial work if you have no time restrictions.
Don’t worry, amateur does not mean incompetent, just the
opposite, amateur hobby cutters consistently produce the finest
cutting and polishing of gems available and often have the
knowledge of a professional gemmologist.

This community can often be a valuable resource for art
jewellers as you will often see beautiful stones that are never
seen in gem suppliers stock or other wholesale stores. You may
also be delighted to learn they are of local origin. Warning!
these people have less business acumen than art jewellers, they
enjoy showing you stones that they won’t sell to you. They also
prosyletise which you should be aware puts you in danger of
becoming addicted too. The most valuable of gems can be those
that were given to you freely by mother earth herself.

Tony.

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@Anthony_Lloyd-Rees
http://www.opalsinthebag.com
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