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Polishing resing inlay work


#1

First I would like to say what a wonderful forum this is for fellow
jewelers to gain insight and tips on their craft.

I’ve recently started working with resin, I have no problem with the
curing or adding opaqe colors to it. My problem is how to polish it.
I find that the exposed side of it needs sanding or polishing to have
the same glossiness of the other sides particularly when pigment is
used. I’m not quite sure of what products or tools to use. Perhaps
there’s even some step that I’m missing that could prevent this in
the first place. Any suggestions?

Thanks,
Janine Beaudette


#2
I've recently started working with resin, I have no problem with
the curing or adding opaqe colors to it. My problem is how to
polish it. 

Janine: I do a lot of work in resin inlay. The finish depends greatly
on the resin itself. What resin are you using? Two part epoxy, or
some other resin.

I take my resin inlay down to 600 grit waterproof sandpaper. After
the sides have been treated with either a brush finish or with
polishing papers, I spray it with matt Krylon spray to seal the
resin and pop the colors. You can use an acrylic spray which would do
the same thing, except make it shinier.

Karen Christians
M E T A L W E R X
10 Walnut St.
Woburn, MA 01801
Ph: 781 937 3532
Fx: 781 937 3955
www.metalwerx.com
email: @Karen_Christians
Board Member of SNAG


#3
    I've recently started working with resin, I have no problem
with the curing or adding opaqe colors to it. My problem is how to
polish it. 

I start out by using a fine file to do the general shaping, and
leaving a little extra margin for additional steps. Then I take it
through progressive grits of sanding media, starting with 320 grit
and going to 600. However, I’ve done some experimentation with the
PSA disks lately taking out scratches and repolishing stones, so I
intend to use these for this step next time. Then I polish with Zam,
and add the final luster with a plastic polish bar compound. You must
be careful not to “melt” the resin with the high speed of your buff
and compound.