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Polishing Question


#1

Hello everyone,

I have a polishing question. I have been contemplating trying a
muslin treated buff. I have never used one and want to know:

  1. What is the buff treated with?
  2. Do I still use a tripoli type compound on it?
  3. What is this particular buff’s main purpose?

I have always used cotton buffs before and just tripoli as the
first step, then moving over to an unstitched cotton buff with
fabuluster for the final polish. Any answers out there as to the
uses of a treated muslin buff?

Barry


#2

I have always used cotton buffs before and just tripoli as the
first step, then moving over to an unstitched cotton buff with
fabuluster for the final polish. Any answers out there as to the
uses of a treated muslin buff?

best regards, geo fox


#3
Any answers out there as to the uses of a treated muslin buff?

I use the treated muslin with bobbing compound (for the initial
polish) it helps take out the small scratches.


#4

Barry:

when I started, my local supplier, who is pretty knowledgeable,
told me to use the treated muslin buff with tripoli and then move
to the unstitched cotton for rouge. works pretty good for gold.
don’t know what the thing’s treated with, I guess something that
makes it a little stiffer so you can press a little harder. for
silver I’m going to start using Zam as an intermediate step
before rouge — hey out there — do i use the Zam on a treated
muslin or on cotton???


#5
For silver I'm going to start using Zam as an intermediate step
before rouge --- hey out there --- do i use the Zam on a treated
muslin or on cotton???

I use the treated for all cutting and intermediate steps.

Brett
Split Image Contracting


#6
am as an intermediate step before rouge --- hey out there ---
do i use the Zam on a treated muslin or on cotton??? >>

I’ve used ZAM on both . . .not much of a difference!!!


#7

I do a lot of silver and have been using bobbing compound, Gray
Star, and Zam. I am under the impression that the Zam acts as a
burnisher…a very thin layer of the surface actually melts? and
smooths over. I spend most of the time with the bobbing compound
which removes some scratches. I spend less time with the Gray
Star which leaves a pretty good shine by itself. Zam takes very
little time. I do not like rouge at all. I don’t like to buff,
it’s a dirty process and rouge is really dirty. All right, I know
it’s not exactly dirt but it seems to get all over things and is
hard to get off of hands etc.

Marilyn Smith


#8

I have been contemplating trying a
muslin treated buff. I have never used one and want to know:
1. What is the buff treated with?
2. Do I still use a tripoli type compound on it?
3. What is this particular buff’s main purpose?
I have always used cotton buffs before and just tripoli as the
first step, then moving over to an unstitched cotton buff with
fabuluster for the final polish. Any answers out there as to the
uses of a treated muslin buff?

I will use any type compound on any type buff if it suites my
needs. The treated buffs are firmer and more durable. The
treatment is not abrasive but it does stiffen the fabric. I use
the treated buffs when I want a wheel surface firmer than a sewn
muslin, but softer than a soft lap.

Dick Caverly


#9

Hi Barry,

On your buffing question. I believe the treated buff have
something like sizing in them. This make material stiffer for
tailor but for us jewelers it make the fiber stronger and tear
or cut resistant. This is the basis for the different buff. Cotton
is weak and breaks easily, reducing loading of compound on the
side of the fiber. Untreated muslin is a stronger fiber and
resist tear better even if you use lamp oil to break down the
binder in rouge, etc. Treated Muslin is in effect strengthen
fiber and should be used with aggressive polishes such as
tripoli, etc. With no lamp use at all since it would break down
the sizing also. Unstitched buffs reduce shock pressure of the
buff on the jewelry which allows better polish in recessed areas.
But it take longer to polish jewelry with this buff. Hope this
helps. Jim alpine@hay.net