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Polishing broom casting


#1

I have a pendant made from pieces of sterling silver that have gone
through the broom casting process. I love the piece but there are
some very challenging crevices that I am trying to polish and looking
for some ideas on how to get into the crevices - both devices and the
kind of wheel.

Thanks very much.
Kathy Hoffer
Vermont


#2

I have a pendant made from pieces of sterling silver that have gone
through the broom casting process. I love the piece but there are
some very challenging crevices that I am trying to polish and
looking for some ideas on how to get into the crevices - both devices
and the kind of wheel.

Thanks very much.
Kathy Hoffer


#3

To get into crevices, I really like the 3M radial disks:
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/ep81se


#4

I have a pendant made from pieces of sterling silver that have gone
through the broom casting process. I love the piece but there are
some very challenging crevices that I am trying to polish and looking
for some ideas on how to get into the crevices - both devices and the
kind of wheel.

Thanks very much.
Kathy Hoffer


#5
To get into crevices, I really like the 3M radial disks:
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/ep81se

Ditto on the 3M radial disks, they’re wonderful.

Cheers,
Becky


#6

I have always had satisfactory result by tumbling my broom
castingswith stainless steel shot of assorted shapes and sizes, with
a splash of adish soap like blue Dawn. One caveat: Use only
stainless shot of jewelry grade, not the typical hardware store/tool
supply shop versions.

Jim Harkins
Blessed be…


#7

kits in my opinion should be complete with several mandrels so that
a person is not slowed down in their polishing. Stopping to change
disks on mandrels is a PIA.

Barbara on a day when hell froze over. foot snow drift in the
driveway and the kitchen door blocked by a drift 3/4 up. This island
is closed until further notice.


#8

I would not recommend any soap that foams. Instead use a burnishing
soap in with your shot. It does not make suds but makes both the
shot and the items being tumbled slippery. The results are fabulous.
Also, do not use too much shot. I find some of my students think more
is better and I caution them to only use whats needed. Say, in a 3 lb
tumbler you only need about a 1/2 inch on the bottom. Add one
heaping teaspoon of the burnishing soap. You can find the soap at
graveslapidary.com Cheers from Don at The Charles Belle Studio in
SOFL.


#9

I have always had satisfactory result by tumbling my broom
castingswith stainless steel shot of assorted shapes and sizes, with
a splash of adish soap like blue Dawn. One caveat: Use only stainless
shot of jewelry grade, not the typical hardware store/tool supply
shop versions.

Jim Harkins
Blessed be…