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Polishing antlers


#1

Does anyone out there have a clue as to how to put a nice polish
on a piece of deer antler? I have a knife blade set into an
antler which has scrimshaw carving of an eagle head at the end.
I’d like to put a polish on this piece without losing any of the
detail of the carving. I can tell you that antler is softer than
regular bone, but that’s about all I know. I’m still VERY new to
all of this and in need of help.

Thanks,
Penny


#2

Does anyone out there have a clue as to how to put a nice polish
on a piece of deer antler?

I would use a good floor type past wax and buffing.

Mike McKim


#3

OK Penny, here’s a little too late: Polish the antlers BEFORE
the scrimshaw work is done next time. Then only minor touch up
will be required afterword. This is not my field of expertise,
but I seem to recall having put a pretty nice polish on antler
with standard jewelers finishing tools. I would definitely
recommend going around the scrimshaw part with hard flex shaft
buffs so as not to distort the pattern. After that standard
tripoli or greystar and then rouge buffs. Good luck, Mike


#4
 Does anyone out there have a clue as to how to put a nice
polish on a piece of deer antler? Penny

G’day Penny: go to your local Mall and get a little tin of brass
polish, and hand-polish your deer antler as you would great
grandma’s silver teapot. But take great care when you get to the
scrimshaw part. Brass polish really works and is gentle but
you’ll need a bit of ‘elbow-grease’ as grandma used to call that
sort of work. Cheers,

        /\
       / /    John Burgess, 
      / /
     / //\    @John_Burgess2
    / / \ \
   / (___) \
  (_________)

#5

hey mike i think she is restoring a piece…maintaining
it…hello?


#6

Hi Penny, I use sanding drums and or cratex wheels or what ever
down to 600 grit and then a hard felt wheel with zam. If I want
it to look like antler again I carve the antler design and color
with shoe polish (liqued). Then sand and polish. Fred


#7

I have some sections of “Metal Jewelry Techniques”, by Marcia
Chamberlain.

While the book does not mention antlers, it does cover horn and
bone working and polishing.

The data on horn seems not too hard on the material.

“To polish horn use powered pumice and water. After rubbing
vigorously, rinse and then polish further with a wet cloth and
powered coal. A final protective polish using soap and Paris
whiting will result in a fine, warm, soft, deep surface shine”

Chamberlain has the same Paris white as the final finish on bone
also, so it may be close. Maybe the place to start is with the
Paris white?

Toothpaste???
I once cleaned up some Hippo tusks with toothpaste. I get nervous
giving advise.

Bill
Ginkgo Designs
@WILLIAM_I_EISENBERG


#8

I am not restoring. I made a piece and now want to polish it.
Thanks for the suggetions. Can I use the Brasso with a flexshaft
or is it better to just do it the old-fashioned way?

Penny


#9

Is Paris Whiting toothpaste or do I need to go looking for it?
Pumice I have, and I think I can get some coal (tho in Fla that
might be tricky!). I have another antler I haven’t made anything
with yet, so I’ll try it on that first.

Thanks!

Penny


#10
Can I use the Brasso with a flexshaft or is it better to just
do it the old-fashioned way? Penny

G’day; Brasso will give as good a hand finish as you can get
with any other method; it isn’t all that hard work. Oh - by the
way - did you know that Brasso gives excellent results used by
hand on Perspex (think you know it as Plexiglass) and other
thermoplastics? When the plastic has been sawn or filed, use
wet/dry papers on the edges with plenty of water, then when you
have got down to 400 grit, use the Brasso on a clean rag, final
polish with a soft cloth. There are special polishes for
plastics, but why bother when yu can get a tin of Brasso at any
supermarket?

        /\
       / /    John Burgess, 
      / /
     / //\    @John_Burgess2
    / / \ \
   / (___) \
  (_________)