Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

Platinum ring stamped IRIDPLAT?


#1

I saw a platinum ring stamped IRIDPLAT What does that mean?


#2

Hi Mark:

I saw a platinum ring stamped IRIDPLAT What does that mean?

In order to be stamped platinum, a piece must be at least 95%
platinum. If the piece is at least 75% platinum and the rest of the
make-up is of platinum group metals (irridium, palladium,ruthenium,
rhodium, or osmium) then the piece can be stamped platinum, but must
be preceded by the abbreviation for the other predominant metal (in
this case irridium or IRID). I also have a ring stamped in this way,
so I had looked it up a while back.

Best Regards,
Kim Starbard
Cove Beads


#3

I have never seen IRIDPLAT as such, but what it means (Unless they
were lying - unlikely) is that it is 10% Iridium Platinum. I may get
flak for this, but to my mind it is the only Platinum alloy worth
bothering with - all the others I have tried, which is many, are
junk, plain and simple. Anyway, not to rant, but that’s what it
means - the oldest, most venerable, most “Genuine” Platinum alloy.


#4

It means it’s 900/100 platinum/iridium alloy, the most common
platinum alloy until recently.

Daniel R. Spirer, G.G.
Daniel R. Spirer Jewelers, LLC
1780 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02140
617-234-4392
@Daniel_R_Spirer
www.spirerjewelers.com


#5

IRIDPLAT really means Platinum with a combined mixture of Iridium.
The ratio references are as follows;

90/10 Pt/IR, or 95/5 Pt/IR…Here are some more necessary facts to
ponder

Casting ratios; =>Wax to Metal 90/10 Pt/Ir is (Wax x 21.5)
Casting ratios; =>Wax to metal 95/ 5 Pt/Ir is (Wax x 21.4)

For other Platinum facts please contact www.pg-platinum-tech.com

When I was with Brad last tour in the States I had the greatest
pleasure of being with Jurgen Maerz of the Platinum Guild
International. He gave me some great including some
printed folders on soldering Platinum and a DVD. I have a few copies
left. If anyone wants them, I will send them out to you, contact me
at @Gerald…gerry! who is always free with …:>)


#6

One of the most common platinum alloys for jewelry use (until the
recent spate of new alloy introductions) was 90% Platinum/10%
Iridium, which is another member of the high price metals club. I
believe it is actually a good bit higher than platinum itself, or
historically has been.

Jim
http://www.forrest-design.com


#7

From http://www.weddingbandsuperstore.com/platinfo.html

In the United States of America, an item to be described as
"platinum" it must be comprised of a fineness of no less than 95%
platinum and 5% PGM’s. Above 95%, the item can be stamped “PLATINUM"
or “PLAT”; whereas from 75-95% Platinum, the PGM’s also must be
stamped; e.g. IRIDPLAT for 10% Iridium alloy. Only the USA allows
"carat platinum” alloys. The most common alloys in America are 95%
Platinum with 5% Ruthenium or 5% Cobalt and 90% Platinum with 10%
Iridium.


#8

It means 10% iridium, 90 % platinum.


#9

The platinum alloy of choice for a long time in the U.S. was Platinum
900/100 Iridium, an alloy containing 900 ppt platinum and 100 ppt
Iridium. This alloy was stamped IRIDPLAT. When the platinum stamping
regulations were revised, this alloy was then stamped 900Pt or
900PLAT or Pt 900. There is still a large amount of jewelry being
produced using this universal alloy.


#10

Hi everyone:

I am curious now from all the answers on this thread…why is it
necessary to add platinum group metals to platinum in the first
place? Is it for color and polishing?

Thanks
Kim Starbard
Cove Beads


#11

For the same reason that gold is alloyed, it’s primarily to make the
metal harder and more durable. Pure platinum is extremely soft (just
like pure gold is).

Daniel R. Spirer, G.G.
Daniel R. Spirer Jewelers, LLC
1780 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02140
617-234-4392
@Daniel_R_Spirer
www.spirerjewelers.com


#12
I am curious now from all the answers on this thread....why is it
necessary to add platinum group metals to platinum in the first
place? Is it for color and polishing? 

For example when wedding bands are machined from tubing or blanks,
the added Ruthenium gives the metal properties which make it behave
better when it is being chipped away, Iridium gives the metal
good properties for casting, possibly better flow,also
each of these metals is rare by themselves and at times their value
even excedes that of platinum,


#13
I am curious now from all the answers on this thread....why is it
necessary to add platinum group metals to platinum in the first
place? Is it for color and polishing? 

Just as is the case with all precious metals, Platinum needs to be
alloyed to improve hardness and workability. Being a dominant metal,
there is very little influence on the color, which is naturally
white. By adding PGM’s to alloy platinum, 100% precious metal is
achieved. There are, however some Platinum alloys where other than
precious metals are used for metallurgical reasons, such as heat
treatment. Platinum can be alloyed with copper, cobalt, gold, silver,
tungsten, gallium, indium etc etc… In the U.S. The most common Pt
alloys are Pt900/100 Iridium, Pt950/50 Iridium, Pt950/Ruthenium
Pt950/Cobalt

Jurgen J. Maerz
Director of Technical Education
PLATINUM GUILD INTERNATIONAL USA
4 Hutton Center Drive, Suite 220
South Coast Metro, CA 92707
Tel: Main 714 442 3101