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Pine Resin


#1

Hi Everyone,

has anyone ever tried a Japanese waxing technique where various
types of wax are melted together with pine resin to make a
stretchy compound that forms striations and other delicate
markings? I read about it in a book, and woulld like to try it,
but I can’t think of where one might find pine resin. If I can
find some, I’ll post the receipe for this stuff. It makes
beautiful, delicate stuff, great for forming leaves, petals, and
swirling designs. Thanks, Ruth

PS, I made some brooches over the weekend with mirror-polish
finishes on their flat surfaces. After I put them in the
ultrasound and steamed them, the slightest touch with a cloth of
any kind, or even the softest t.p., put fine scratches on them.
This particular customer won’t take them with even a hair of a
xcratch, even though she knows within 5 minutes of wearing, or
after wiping a fingerprint off, they will be scratched again.
I’ve tried to convince her to go with a satin finish or
sand-blasted finish, but she wants mirror! Is there anything
that can be done to prevent this type of scratching? Thanks,
Ruth


#2

I’ve tried to convince her to go with a satin finish or
sand-blasted finish, but she wants mirror! Is there anything
that can be done to prevent this type of scratching? Thanks,
Ruth

Ruth: sounds like it would have to be laquered…Dave

Art Jewelry for Conscious People
http://www.opendoor.com/stephensdesign/crystalguy.html


#3

Actually you need to get rosin from an art supplier - it comes
powdered - Daniel Smith in Seattle carries it - if there is
nothing local e-mail me and I will look up the address - I know
how to drive there but never remember the address, they also
will mail order.

I have played with this recipe and you have to experiment a bit
before you get a mixture that works but it cast well and doesn’t
smell particularly obnoxious while burning out.

Stella Samson - @MOIRAG2112


#4

Hi,

Could the pine resin of which you speak come from the 'blisters’
on the smooth bark of Balsam trees? If so all you need is a
little container, a pocket knife, and a balsam pine forest.
This stuff is also a great dressing for ‘bandaging’ a wound in
the forest. Be sure to keep the container covered because the
air will make it very resinous:) and tacky. It is the stuff
turpentine and pitch are made from. Any smooth barked pine will
do. Hope this helps.

Skip

                                  Skip Meister
                                NRA Endowment and
                                   Instructor
                                @Skip_Meister
                                05/06/9702:06:07

#5

but I can’t think of where one might find pine resin.

Hi Ruth, Fine Woodworking says: “Turpentine: Called rosin in
Colonial America, turpentine is the resin obtained from the gum
(sap) of fir, balsam, pine, larch, spruce, or other
conifers”…“and rosin (also called colophony), the resin of
various species of American pine tree.” You might be able to find
it at an artists supply shop.

PS, I made some brooches over the weekend with mirror-polish
finishes on their flat surfaces. After I put them in the
ultrasound and steamed them, the slightest touch with a cloth of
any kind, or even the softest t.p., put fine scratches on them.

Try to rinse them in spirits and let them dry alone. They should
dry without any spots. Hope this will be of any help, Markus


#6

but I can’t think of where one might find pine resin.

Hi Ruth, Fine Woodworking says: “Turpentine: Called rosin in
Colonial America, turpentine is the resin obtained from the gum
(sap) of fir, balsam, pine, larch, spruce, or other
conifers”…“and rosin (also called colophony), the resin of
various species of American pine tree.” You might be able to find
it at an artists supply shop.

PS, I made some brooches over the weekend with mirror-polish
finishes on their flat surfaces. After I put them in the
ultrasound and steamed them, the slightest touch with a cloth of
any kind, or even the softest t.p., put fine scratches on them.

Try to rinse them in spirits and let them dry alone. They should
dry without any spots. Hope this will be of any help, Markus