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Pickling white gold


#1

What is the best way to clean white gold after soldering? I am doing
some repairs and have found the only way to clean the oxidization
through an abrasive method. Thanks.


#2

You’ve obviously noticed that normal pickle doesn’t work with white
gold. The method I use is to paint the item with flux and then heat
it until it stops bubbling, but not sufficiently to melt the solder.
Remove the flux the normal way and the white gold is clean.

Regards, Gary Wooding


#3

Try using more boric acid and more flux to PREVENT oxidation, then
use a good pickle, Sparex is good.


#4

Hi,

I thing the best way is to dip the piece in borax BEFORE any
soldering process if you work on a new fabrication… It’ll leave the
polish and the white color of gold intact…Of course don’t forget to
clean it after your work in the pickling acid ;-))

If you work on repair, most of the time the rhodium around the
solder will look dull… Use diamond compound to polish the piece,
you’ll be able to repolish the rhodium layer at the same time…

Have a good day,
Ced the Belgian


#5

In very bad situations I resort to electro-stripping. A lot of
bother, but it works.

The method I use is to paint the item with flux and then heat it
until it stops bubbling, but not sufficiently to melt the solder.
Remove the flux the normal way and the white gold is clean. 

I have tried Gary’s method above with some success. What flux do you
use for the best results?


#6
What is the best way to clean white gold after soldering? I am
doing some repairs and have found the only way to clean the
oxidization through an abrasive method 

Are you coating with boric solution before you solder? Are you
heating too slowly allowing the boric coating to burn away?

Are you using too much of an oxidizing flame?

A few minutes in either sulfuric or citric acid for a few minutes
should do the trick.

L F Brown Goldwork, Inc
www.goldwork.com


#7

I’m in UK and use a liquid flux called Auflux. Its a
yellowish-green, slightly “day-glow” colour, with a consistency of
water. The name comes from the chemical symbol of gold (Au) - hence
Au Flux.

Regards, Gary Wooding