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PickleIt - how it works?


#1

Hi, I recently received notice of a product called “PickleIt- Surface
preparation for metals.” The ad goes on to say: "Unlike traditional
chemically harsh pickles, PickleIt is a safe alternative that will
perform the process of removing fire scale and oxidation from silver,
bronze and copper in most instances. " This material is supposedly
made from 100% non-toxic food grade materials and is activated by
boiling.

Does anyone know what this is and how it works? Thanks, Sarah


#2
Does anyone know what this is and how it works?

Don’t know, but I’d take a guess that it’s citric acid, a much safer
to use, and potentially food grade, acid that’s been discussed as a
pickle a number of times here on Orchid. I’m guessing someone took
notice and started selling the stuff with a cool sounding name.
Citric acid is slower than sodium bisulphate, but it does generally
work.

Peter Rowe


#3

Ask for a MSDS, if they don’t offer one before purchase don’t buy it.
The ad says "a blend of natural 100% non-toxic food grade materials"
well that is marketing hype after all even water is toxic in large
enough quantities. So why not use citric acid, it is in many foods
and drinks and is non toxic in reasonable quantities. Even food grade
citric acid is inexpensive and can be used in a standard crock pot.
With citric acid there is no need to boil it and apparently you need
to boil the PickelIt.

James Binnion
James Binnion Metal Arts


#4

I’d guess citric acid-based pickle, maybe JUST citric acid. You can
buy food-grade citric acid at a store that carries canning supplies
or bulk spices. It works as advertised, but leaves a very sticky
residue on everything around the pickle pot. I haven’t found it
necessary to boil it, just used it in a small crock pot like Sparex

I went back to the sparex / dry pool acid pickles because of the
sticky residue issue.


#5
citric [snip] works as advertised, but leaves a very sticky residue
on everything around the pickle pot. I haven't found it necessary
to boil it, just used it in a small crock pot like Sparex I went
back to the sparex / dry pool acid pickles because of the sticky
residue issue. 

Huh! I’ve been using citric acid for a few years and haven’t noticed
anything like that! I suspect it says more about your crock pot than
about the acid. On the other hand, I have my very small hot pot
(which has a really nicely-fitted lid) sitting in a rectangular
plastic box, along with my little rinse bowl, both in case of spills
and so that I have a place to set down my copper tongs without
getting drips on my bench.

Noel


#6

Re: sticky residue when using citric acid. Is it possible that you
used citric acid that had sugar added to it? I was told to be sure,
when purchasing citric acid at the grocery store to read the label,
as some of it comes with either sugar or dextrose added to it.

I have used plain citric acid which I got at the local chemical
supply place, and it worked just fine with no sticky residue.
However, I have since switched to PH down, pool acid as it is so
readily available, and very reasonably priced. Alma


#7

Re sticky residue: No, I don’t think so - I’m sure what I have is
pure food-grade citric acid. But it does leave a mess when it
evaporates.

Regards,
Bob