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Pickle


#1

How do you dispose of dead pickle?

Deb


#2

soak it in baking powder it kills it

      Marty (gold'n Creations)

#3

We neutralize with baking soda. Besides the bubbles are fun. Rick


#4

How do you dispose of dead pickle?

I clean my toilet with it. But I’m begining to think new pickle
would work better.

Dick Caverly


#5

Deb:

You keep adding baking soda to the pickle until it stops foaming
up and then it is safe to flush down the toilet. That is, if you
are talking about Sparex or something similar.


#6

I use fast running water and slowly pour down drain while running
the water. I continue to run water for about a full minute after.
I don’t know if this is OK, it’s just what I do. Joy from Illinois


#7
 How do you dispose of dead pickle? 

I dump it into a an old kitty litter box, then dump in some some
baking soda (to neutralize it) wait for it all to evaporate and
then dump the chrystals into the trash can.


#8

I know that it is cheap, but is there a reason to use all that
baking soda?

Bruce D. Holmgrain
e-mail: @Bruce_Holmgrain


phone:: 703-593-4652


#9
I know that it is cheap, but is there a reason to use all that
baking soda?

You could just drop in some limestone…and let is sit till it
stops bubbling.

Lester…


#10
   I know that it is cheap, but is there a reason to use all
that baking soda?

G’day Bruce; Yes. When you take the work from the pickle jar it
has acid adhering. (especially if like me you use 10% sulphuric).
I dip it into the soda pot to neutralise. One could use a pot of
water, or run the work under the tap, I suppose, but I prefer the
jar of - in my case washing soda, sodium carbonate - because I
bought a large packet a a good while ago and might as well use it
up! It’s even cheaper than bicarb, Cheers,

        /\
       / /    John Burgess, Nelson, New Zealand
      / /
     / //\    @John_Burgess2
    / / \ \
   / (___) \
  (_________)

#11

I dip it into the soda pot to neutralise. One could use a pot of
water, or run the work under the tap, I suppose, but I prefer the
jar of - in my case washing soda, sodium carbonate -

Hi John…that sounds like a much simpler solution (no pun
intended) than going to the sink each time, as I’ve been doing. I
use Sparex. What’s the ratio you use of soda to water? And how
ofter does it need to be changed? As always, your help is
appreciated! Mollie Western North Carolina


#12
    What's the ratio you use of soda to water? And how often does
it need to be changed?

G’day Mollie; The washing soda or bicarbonate soda-to-water ratio
is completely unimportant. There just has to be sufficient soda to
neutralise the acid left on the workpiece. I have a glass pot
holding about a pint or 500mls of water and I just throw in a
small handfull of soda. When does it need changing? When bubbles no
longer arise from the workpiece or the liquid no longer feels
’slippery’ or if you want to be a bit more positive, you could put
in enough beetroot juice (without vinegar!) to act as an indicator
and colour the liquid - the alkali will turn it blue, though as
light fades it, you may need to add more later. Litmus would be
better, but I doubt you’d have that. When it goes pink your soda is
used up. But as soda is so cheap and easily available, just change
it when you think of it. A simple solution? Lousy pun intended.
Cheers,

        /\
       / /    John Burgess, Nelson, New Zealand
      / /
     / //\    @John_Burgess2
    / / \ \
   / (___) \
  (_________)

#13
You could just drop in some limestone....and let is sit till it
stops bubbling.

I have some friends with a limestone driveway. Under the driveway
is a pit filled with more limestone. The theory is that when acid
is dumped slowly into this area of the drive, that the stones
dispurse the liquid, and neutralize it.

Marrin Fleet
@Marrin_and_Mary_Dell
Memphis, TN