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Pickle alternatives


#1

I was told by the tech at Hereaus that a heated 50% solution of phosphoric
acid is the ideal pickle.


#2

I was told by the tech at Hereaus that a heated 50% solution of phosphoric
acid is the ideal pickle.

Forgive me if I am wrong but doesnt that sound along the lines of a heated
(concentrated) Coke or Pepsi solution?

There are some words on pickle alternatives in the ‘Shop tools’ article on
the tips page. Vinegar and salt are reasonable one, alum which is used for
making pickles and found in the supermarket makes a good pickle, almost no
fumes apparently, about one ounce per three liters of water or so is
supposed to work well. Ever wondered why we call it pickle? It is because
jewelelrs used to use alum for pickling with.

Charles

Brain Press
Box 1624, Ste M, Calgary, Alberta, T2P 2L7, Canada
Tel: 403-263-3955 Fax: 403-283-9053 Email: @Charles_Lewton-Brain

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#3

It works, but as for “Ideal” I don’t know. Phosphoric acid is what we use
to etch glass, but in a dilluted quantity! CP phoshopric will eat anything
made of silica (glass). TimGoodwin @tmn8tr


#4

I recall that denatured alcohol was used as a pickle, too, but I keep
imagining bench fires…

Whats the scoop on citric acid as a pickle?- saw it advertised in a tool
supply place in Santa Fe last fall.

Rick Hamilton
Richard D. Hamilton, Jr
http://www.rick-hamilton.com
@rick_hamilton


#5

My apologies, phosphoric doesn’t eat silica. I was thinking of hydroflouric
acid. Sorry for the misTim Goodwin.


#6

I was told by the tech at Hereaus that a heated 50% solution of phosphoric
acid is the ideal pickle.

Forgive me if I am wrong but doesnt that sound along the lines of a heated
(concentrated) Coke or Pepsi solution? <grin>

Indeed you are correct, in fact, I’ve considered boiling up some Coke and
trying it… :slight_smile: Unfortunately, the phosphoric acid in Coke is too weak.
The thinking behind the phosphoric acid pickle is in regard to the now
common bright cast gold alloys. Apparently, sodium bisulphate pickles can
etch the silicon and enter into the grain of the metal weakening it, or so
I have been told. The phosphoric acid pickle also leaves silver pure white,
that is, it removes the black and gray fire scale that Sparex frequently
seems to leave.

Jeffrey Everett


#7

Hi Rick, Denaturated alcohol will not work, as it will not dissolve
copperoxide. Citric acid is a good alternative to sulphuric acid as it
will not turn your clothes into fishing nets. Markus


#8

Indeed you are correct, in fact, I’ve considered boiling up some Coke and
trying it… :slight_smile: Unfortunately, the phosphoric acid in Coke is too weak.
The thinking behind the phosphoric acid pickle is in regard to the now
common bright cast gold alloys. Apparently, sodium bisulphate pickles can
etch the silicon and enter into the grain of the metal weakening it, or so
I have been told. The phosphoric acid pickle also leaves silver purewhite,
that is, it removes the black and gray fire scale that Sparex frequently
seems to leave.

So would it be beneficial to use with regular sterling? Are there any
dangers (does it eat holes in clothes) and where do you get phosphoric
acid? Dave

Art Jewelry for Conscious People
http://www.opendoor.com/stephensdesign/crystalguy.html


#9

On 08-Apr-97, Dave Stephens wrote about: Re: pickle alternatives:
(Phosphoric acid)

DS> So would it be beneficial to use with regular sterling? Are there any
DS> dangers (does it eat holes in clothes) and where do you get phosphoric
DS> acid? Dave

G’day: Phosphoric acid does eat holes in clothes when you
leave it on them. It is usually sold as a rust remover - Rustban
is the one in NZ, but I expect you can get similar things in the
USA at your local hardware/paint store. But use it with care,
eh? Cheers,

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     / //\    @John_Burgess2
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