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Photographing reflective jewelery


#1
Just saw your post on Ganoskin and am having a heck of a time
taking non reflective digital pictures with my 2 megapixel Fuji
camera. I bought a Cloud Dome and thought that was the answer to my
reflection problem but it wasn't, it fixed about 75%. 

There are three things you can try…

  1. A polarizing filter which reduces the glare by “bending” the
    light – these are available to fit most cameras – but not all
    digitals.

  2. A matte spray – available at camera supply stores – mine is
    "Sureguard # 981" made by McDonald Pro-tectecta-Cote. I have also
    used things like hairspray and fixative sprays (Art supply) in a
    pinch. The disadvantage is that you have to clean the stuff of
    afterwards…

  3. A secondary diffuser between your light bulb/fixture and the
    "dome" or cone itself.

Lastly, if you are really desperate and the surface allows it - I
have used ordinary oil based modeling clay/Plastelina formed into a
cylinder and “rolled” over the surface to dull it down. This is
kinda hard to do evenly, but it wipes right off with a paper towel
and you just try again…

Brian P. Marshall
Stockton Jewelry Arts School
2207 Lucile Ave.
Stockton, CA 95209
209-477-0550 Workshop/Studio/Classrooms


#2

I’ve tried the matte spray which I got from a photography supply. It
was very unsatisfactory. it sprayed on in little dots which were
very apparent at the close range I was photographing. It would
probably be fine for large objects shot from farther away.

On another note, I recently tried the clear Museum Gel, a sticky
substance which I hoped would hold rings upright while I
photographed them. It did not stick to the metal at all.

Janet Kofoed


#3

I haven’t tried it yet - don’t know why, but a photographer friend
said he uses vaseline on highly reflective jewelry. I suppose it
would clean off nicely in warm soapy water? Michelle

www.sumiche.com
creating what you want in platinum, gold and silver


#4

You might try some of the anti-reflective spray that the Motion
Picture industry uses. But I couldn’t right now tell you just where
to get it.

Margaret