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Photo etchers?


#1

HI Folks,

I was just reading through Mary Ann Scherr’s section on photo etching in
Metals Technic. It’s something I’ve wanted to get into, and this
seems like the easiest/best way to go. I have a couple questions… is
anyone familiar with this process?

On the other hand, does anyone know where I could send a sheet of
"camera ready" art and have an etched sheet of sterling returned?
Sounds like a job for the good faries, huh?

Dave Sebaste

P.S. Does anyone know if Mary Ann has an email address?


#2

At 11:27 AM 12/6/96 -0800, you wrote:

HI Folks,

I was just reading through Mary Ann Scherr’s section on photo etching in
Metals Technic. It’s something I’ve wanted to get into, and this
seems like the easiest/best way to go. I have a couple questions… is
anyone familiar with this process?

On the other hand, does anyone know where I could send a sheet of
"camera ready" art and have an etched sheet of sterling returned?
Sounds like a job for the good faries, huh?

There is a company out of California that will do this - for a price. I
can’t remember their name at the moment, I believe it is Daniel something.
Email me if noone else tells you and I will look it up for you. They also
have a whole catalog of pre-etched metal, as well.

@Amy_Hale

Dave Sebaste

P.S. Does anyone know if Mary Ann has an email address?

orchid@ganoksin.com

procedures


#3

There is a company out of California that will do this - for a price. I
can’t remember their name at the moment, I believe it is Daniel something.
Email me if noone else tells you and I will look it up for you. They also
have a whole catalog of pre-etched metal, as well.

amy@seanet.com

I think you mean David H.Fell & Co., Inc.,6009 Bandini Blvd., City of
Commerce, CA 90040 800-822-1996 They also have good gold prices I’ve
heard. They do all of my refining and I’d recommend them.

Kim


#4

I took her workshop at Arrowmont about three years ago. What’s your
question?

Marilyn Smith


#5

Hi Marilyn,

My questions about the photo etch process:

Question 1: In reading Mary Ann’s piece, it never talks about
applying a photosensitive substance to the screen. Do the screens
come pre-treated and ready to expose?

Question 2: After applying the resist through the screen, you can
gently clean the screen and reuse it. Doesn’t the resist solvent and
brushing have an adverse effect on the photosensitive material on the
screen?

Question 3: Any idea how much additional screens cost?

Thanks,

Dave Sebaste
davidse@MICROSOFT.com


#6

Hi Marilyn,

My questions about the photo etch process:

Question 1: In reading Mary Ann’s piece, it never talks about
applying a photosensitive substance to the screen. Do the screens
come pre-treated and ready to expose?

Question 2: After applying the resist through the screen, you can
gently clean the screen and reuse it. Doesn’t the resist solvent and
brushing have an adverse effect on the photosensitive material on the
screen?

Question 3: Any idea how much additional screens cost?

Thanks,

Dave Sebaste
davidse@MICROSOFT.com


#7

Hi Marilyn,

My questions about the photo etch process:

Question 1: In reading Mary Ann’s piece, it never talks about
applying a photosensitive substance to the screen. Do the screens
come pre-treated and ready to expose?

Question 2: After applying the resist through the screen, you can
gently clean the screen and reuse it. Doesn’t the resist solvent and
brushing have an adverse effect on the photosensitive material on the
screen?

Question 3: Any idea how much additional screens cost?

Thanks,

Dave Sebaste
davidse@MICROSOFT.com


#8

The Rio catalog carries the Rio Master Etch-Press System. It
lists at $95.95. Extra screens are 5 for $10.25 . The screens
are ready to be exposed. When I was in the class, the materials
other than the acid, were enviromentaly sound. We used water
soluable inks and removed them with something like a machanic’s
hand cleaner. It was difficult to clean the screens after use and
they are also fairly small. If you are working in silver, this is
probably not a problem. You can use the screens quite a few
times. The print lights were actually bulbs used in the early
polariod camerias. They are very bright and hot. She had been
working with the Rio people so I assume that the compounds are
still the ones that she found. We got very crisp results.

Marilyn


#9

Say, don’t wanna blow anybody’s enthusiasm but the Rio Etch
system got slammed pretty badly in the rec.crafts.jewelry
newsgroup for producing bad details. At one time I had that
little silkscreen press, you can buy it at some art supply
places, and its not capable of holding tiny details like 6 point
type. It uses proprietary flash bulbs to expose (actually it
flash burns away a thing plastic sheet for resist). So if you’re
expecting to etch halftone images of photos , forget it. I’ve
slightly experiemented with laser toner resists and that works
best on copper/brass and crudely on silver and nitric…Dave

Art Jewelry for Conscious People
http://www.opendoor.com/stephensdesign/crystalguy.html
Dr. E. Aspler
Managing Director
Ganoksin Jewelry Co.,Ltd.
aspler@ganoksin.com


#10

The problem I had with the etch press system (silksreening resist onto
metal) is that the resist would spread a little after screening onto
the metal. This would eliminate any fine detail.

However, I got my moneys worth out of it by using it for screen
printing on paper for jewelry cards and stuff. The trick is to print
some everyday to keep the ink flowing and trash the screen when you
have printed all you need or whatever.

Kenneth Gastineau
gastin@mis.net