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Pewter casting question


#1

I was wondering if it is possible to cast pewter directly into
vulcanized rubber molds.

Thanks
Brian Shafer


#2
   I was wondering if it is possible to cast pewter directly into
vulcanized rubber molds. 

Yes it is. We have several customers currently doing that for large
pieces such as tiles. Please visit our website at www.conquestind.com
and contact me with any other questions.

George Gray george@conquestind.com www.conquestind.com (562) 906-1111
Ext. 231 (562) 906-1183 Fax


#3
I was wondering if it is possible to cast pewter directly into
vulcanized rubber molds.

Yes it is. I have melted pewter in an iron ladle on my stove and
poured it into a rubber vulcanized mold. I found I had to cut some
air channels to help the metal enter the mold. Annette


#4

I was wondering if it is possible to cast pewter directly into
vulcanized rubber molds.

Not the natural rubber, like Castaldo gold or white label rubbers.
But you CAN cast pewter directly into most types of silicone rubber
mold. You may need to make the mold differently in order to be able
to pour it. Such as, for example, actual vents, which are like very
thin sprues toing to endpoints where air might trap, the vents being
thin wire sized, and leading back to the front of the mold next to
the sprue opening. Not always needed, but sometimes… The few
times I’ve done this, I arranged to pack the rubber and vulcanize it
(I was using a vulcanizing type, not an RTV, though they work too) in
a small casting flask, not a mold frame. that meant I could put the
mold back into the flask for pouring the pewter, which I did using my
centrifuge, since I’d not had luck getting this particular detailed
thing to fill with just a gravity pour. Worked quite well. Do
understand that casting pewter or other white metals into these molds
will eventually wear them out, but you’ll be able, if you do it
carefully, to get hundreds of castings from one mold. The costume
jewelery industry uses vulcanized silicone rubber molds that are disk
shaped, 9 to 12 inches in diameter, with the sprue hole on the side,
in the center. The molds are spun like records on a high speed
record player, and metal poured into that center sprue hole as it
spins. mold cavities are arranged radially, like spokes on a wheel,
and once the mold has spun long enough for the metal to have
sufficiently cooled, the castings can be removed. Much white metal
costume jewelery is made this way.

Peter