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Pendant not hanging straight


#1

I’ve made a pendant, set the stones, patina, texture and now once
I’ve placed the necklace it’s slightly crooked (ie. not horizontal).
What is the easiest was to fix? I’d prefer not to take the piece a
part and solder.

Thanks for any help,
Scott


#2
I've placed the necklace it's slightly crooked (ie. not
horizontal). What is the easiest was to fix? I'd prefer not to take
the piece a part and solder. 

add a small lead weight until it hangs right?

Sorry, fix is to fix it. You may need to redo the bale, if that’s
the problem area.

Elaine
CreativeTextureTools.com


#3

Unless you convince your customer that you made it this way for
artistic reasons you’ll probably have to un- and resolder the jump
ring.


#4

sorry, can’t offer suggestion for correction as I can’t see what the
problem might be. Many different reasons for inbalance in how a
pendant is hanging.

John


#5

I am not a professional about this, but if it has a bail, I would try
to shim the bail where the cord will touch. Or, if it works with the
design, make a piece that goes onto the cord, put the pendant on
that, and make it just enough out of wack to straight the pendant.
Or, can the bail be stretched a bit one way?

Some one will help, I bet this is easier to fix than you think,
because it happens to everyone some time.

Roxy


#6

Can you post a picture so we can see it?

[Edit]

How can I share files and pictures with the list?
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/ftp

Or… send the files to the attention of service@ganoksin.com and
we will upload them for you…

[/Edit]


#7
I've made a pendant, set the stones, patina, texture and now once
I've placed the necklace it's slightly crooked (ie. not
horizontal). What is the easiest was to fix? I'd prefer not to take
the piece a part and solder. 

The answer depends on how easily you could unset and reset the
stones. If this would be only annoying to have to do, but not
difficult to actually do, then just bite the bullet and fix the
thing.

If, on the other hand, getting the stone out and back in is a risk
or difficult, etc, then here are a couple other options.

Sometimes, depending on the design of the bale, you may be able to
bend it to one side, shifting how it hangs. This isn’t satisfying
aesthetically, as you’ve improved how it hangs, but then the bale
looks off. But sometimes it only takes a little bit.

You can remove and replace the bale if you have access to a PUK
welder or Laser welder, without removing the stones or even
drastically affecting the finish. If you don’t have such, as I expect
is the case, find someone who does who can help. These days,
increasing numbers of commercial jewelry shops have them, and having
a pro fix it for you may be the simplest. There are a number of
people here on Orchid, myself included, who could do this for you,
though in my case at least, I imagine you’d have to ship it to me.
Finding someone local would be easier.

You may be able to shift the center of gravity by attaching another
piece, perhaps with a rivet, to the high side. Or maybe hang
something, another stone perhaps, adding to the design that way.

Sometimes you might be able to open up the bale and fit a tube into
it, off center, and rivet it to the bail or to the piece itself.
Being off center through the bail can be an interesting design
element if you plan it well, and it can fix the hanging problem. You
do have to figure out how to attach it gracefully and securely,
however.

Just a few thoughts. Perhaps one will be of use.

Peter Rowe


#8

Peter Rowe, as always, has made some wonderful suggestions.Can it be
that the problem is with the shape of the pendant. Unfortunately,
there is no easy fix… If it is asymmetrical, it may have more weight
on one side, resulting in it not hanging straight, unless the bale is
positioned correctly. In order to correct it, you would have to
remove the stones (carefully so that the bezels are not damaged),
then remove the bale in order to reposition it. However, trying some
of the ideas that Peter has given which would act as a counter
balance may well solve the problem.

Alma


#9

people -

my immediate thought on the tipsy pendant was to:

(1) skew it - bend it to the right or left. i’ve done several pieces
with intentionally off-set bails skewed either to left or right,
using the pendant weight to balance it horizontally - first
determine which way the bail should bend, right or left, to make the
pendant hang straight. if your bail is top-mounted and long enough to
be bent, use round nose pliers, insert one ‘nose’ into bail and with
a bezel pusher gently nudge the top of bail in the direction opposite
to the way the pendant is off-horizontal: if the bottom is
off-center left, then push bail to the right (do i really have to go
into the right off-center part, people?) or

(2) if you can do one small, quick solder job, smoosh (a southern
technical term) the bail flat and, after determining the correct top
center of pendant and clamping a heat sink or some cool-coat onto
now-flat bail, solder on a new bail; the flattened bail will look
like a design element and not a repair job. or you can hang the
pendant in a conspicuous spot with a warning taped on it: DO NOT DO
IT THIS WAY AGAIN and forget it.

good luck -
ive
think more now, do less repair work later.


#10

If you could do a small solder job, adding a second bail might to do
the trick. A double bail could be very attractive.