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Peach Moonstone?


#1

A friend of mine just asked me about the provenance of a stone
identified as “peach moonstone”. I haven’t seen this stone, only an
e-mailed description, as follows:

“…pale peach, irridescent, almost but not quite translucent”

Anyone out there in Orchid-land know about a stone being sold by this
name? What is it? Is it a stone, or is it some sort of glass or
plastic?

Thanks in advance,
Kat


#2

I have often used the “peach” or “apricot” moonstones, as well as
gray. They are the real thing, I think. What say the stone experts?? Gini


#3

I buy cabs sometimes and beads alot of this material it is called
Peach Moonstone, it is not Rainbow Moonstone as it does not have that
flash. It is a lovely stone.

Laura


#4

Hi Kat, Peach moonstone is a moonstone which has a peach color. It is
from India.and is a natural stone and a natural color. Diane
http://jdfindings.com


#5

If it IS a peach moonstone (since I haven’t seen it, I can’t be
sure), then what it is, is a peach moonstone. ie there are moonstones
(one of the many feldspars) that are peach colored that are
"irridescent, almost but not quite translucent"

good luck
gregor


#6

Dear Kat, Pale peach moonstones are frequently produced from Sri
Lankan rough. It is usually readily available at the Tucson shows and
from most vendors dealing in calibrated goods. Suggest you get ahold
of the current Buyer’s Guide issue of the Lap. Journal. Ron at Mills Gem, Los Osos, CA.


#7

Dear Kat No its not plastic it is a real member of the feldspar family
like sunstone or laborderite( sp? ) some exhibit chatoyancy ( catseye
) and the family moonstone comes in many colors with blue being the
rarest…it also comes in grey\ black, white and rainbow

HTH
Ron


#8

AFAIK, it’s plain ordinary moonstone that’s a pale pinky color, with
maybe a touch of yellow… hence ‘peach’! I wouldn’t call it
irridescent, just the usual ‘billowy’ light of moonstone. I have some
from India, and it also came in white, grey, and brownish tones.

HTH!

Carol
Carol J. Bova
@Carol_J_Bova


#9

I have stones that are this color in moonstone material although I
have always called it orange moonstone. Some of it does look a little
peachy though so maybe someone is calling it peach instead.

Daniel R. Spirer, GG
Spirer Somes Jewelers
1794 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02140
@spirersomes
http://www.spirersomes.com


#10

Hi Kat. I have two peach moonstones which I purchased at one of the
International gem shows a few years ago. They look like their
name— peach colored moonstones—have a bit of chatoyancy, and are
quite lovely. I was assured that they are not glass or synthetic
but real stones. Perhaps someone else can give you their mineral
composition.
Cheers- Alma.


#11

I have tumbled many pounds of a moonstone feldspar from Sri Lanka
and/or India, which has a peach body color. It seems popular enough
that marketers have made a “niche” for it by that name. Likewise, I
have black (really charcoal gray) and other off colors. The rough is
normally available rather inexpensively, and it will produce cabs of
several carats without undue trouble. As with other moonstones,
larger cabs are problematic because of the way the stuff is mined
reducing the rough to quarter-sized chunks.


#12

All,

Feldspars come in a variety of colors, transparencies, and
adluresence. Moonstone is generally the translucent form of feldspar
which had an adlurescence which resembles a half moon. It comes in
white, peach, orange, green, and many off color combinations of these
colors. It is natural.

The opaque varieties of feldspar come in many varieties also. The
ones which have multiple peacock colors are often called Labradorite
or Spectrolite. Labradorite comes from Labrador, and Spectrolite
comes from Madagascar or Finland (normally). It is natural.

There are other varieties in massive formations that are used for
monuments, and decorative designs. Gerry Galarneau


#13

Hi Gang,

  Feldspars come in a variety of colors, transparencies, and
adluresence.  Moonstone is generally the translucent form of
feldspar which had an adlurescence which resembles a half moon.  It
comes in white, peach, orange, green, and many off color
combinations of these colors.  It is natural. 

Now if that’s not enough, the spring issue of Gems & Gemology has
some info on a new moonstone product. Someone is applying differnet
colors of a dichroic layer to the bottom/back side of moonstone cabs.
The face up appearance shows a different color depending on the color
of the applied dichroic backing. The article indicated the dichroic
moonstones where available at Tucson last Feb.

The backing was said to be easily damaged.

Dave