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Pave setting video instructions?


#1

Hello,

Anyone know of any good books or preferably videos that focus on
pave stone setting instruction?

Thanks,
Chris


#2

Hello Chris I have diagrams I did some years ago when I was teaching
showing the stages in pave setting. Not sure how I can post them to
you though. Cheers Hamish

[Edit]

Sharing files and pictures with Orchid is easy - Simply attach them
to your Orchid post.

[/Edit]


#3

Hi

The only videos I have found in my extensive search is
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/ep81q5 I have the DVD 3 and it it is
good. I’m planning to buy the rest of the DVD’s.

I’m focusing to micro pave setting.

Timo


#4

Chris & Hamish

If you both go to “BenchTube” on Orchid, you will see my video’s on
this great topic.

You will see how I use Pave’ setting extensively. I have also
provided many video’s in great detail, how to sharpen & polish the
gravers. If you also want my numerous essays on this topic, I have
them as well. All you need to do is ‘ask me for them’.

Gerry Lewy


#5

I hope these might help you, it is important to have the tools well
prepared and sharpened. Also the stones need to be let into the
metal, today people use Hart burrs, so that the girdle is just under
the surface of themetal, they shouldn’t rock about. The picture is
of a Pave set ring I made when an apprentice many years ago, just to
make sure we’re on the right track. Don’t hesitate ask if you want
me to expand. You may need more detail on selecting and sharpening
tools.





#6

Hamish,

Thank you for the info and posting the images.

Chris


#7

Chris, here is a guy who could teach all of us something.


#8

I saw this diamond setting-video, very interesting. BUT! Not one
word of narration of any form or explanation during the whole setting
process, why?? …Gerry


#9

Gerry,

Gotcha on the videos. thanks for putting those together in the first
place.

I would love a full length video/dvd that focuses on Pave. From the
beginning, all the way to the end. From tools needed, graver prep
and polish, stone spacing & drilling holes correctly, etc.

As for tutorial instruction, if you were to travel down to Saint
Louis here in Missouri, I would recommend maybe trying to set up
something with our local school called Craft Alliance. They often
have visiting instructors who offer a weekend or day class on the
subject they’d like to teach. Perhaps you just do one on one, not
sure. Craft Alliance has instructors that teach a range of "crafts."
They have two locations in the city with shops dedicated to
metalsmithing. They are fortunate to have a few full-time local
instructors who are strong in the art of metalsmithing. I have taken
a number of classes there. The art of stone setting, especially the
technical aspects of pave, is something I haven’t seen come through
there. Anyways, check out their website. Craft Alliance They are
professional and “we are not talking about gluing cotton balls on
paper plates here” kind of training.

If you came down, I’d take your class if it were on the weekend.

Right now, I think learning through a DVD would be the best as funds
and time is a critical factor.

In your videos, when you say 4/0 emery paper. is their a way to
translate that to # of grit? 600 grit? 800 grit? Most of the suppliers
I use only sell the paper in grit and not 4/0, 3/0 etc.

Regards,
Chris Young


#10

Mark,

Thanks for the video. I have seen this before a few times myself. Do
you have any idea what type of wheel he is using to polish up all
those gravers?

Thanks,
Chris


#11
BUT! Not one word of narration of any form or explanation during
the whole setting process, why?? 

I think perhaps because it’s not intended as instruction, but
rather, as a means of illustrating what one learns when one goes to
the man’s school. He’s trying to advertise his school, where he can
charge for detailed instruction, instead of trying to really teach
over U-tube. Those videos are tantalizing and give lots of good
hints, but not really complete anywhere. Even so, pretty
inspiring to watch.

Peter


#12
Do you have any idea what type of wheel he is using to polish up
all those gravers? 

Funny you should say that, that is EXACTLY what I was wondering
Chris! My silicon wheels are all too soft, and I have dozens of
diferent ones. I always work under my scope and tried a few
different wheels the other day on a graver, I need a harder material
wheel but one that will leave a bright finish on steel. I was
thinking about sending a short clip to Gesswein since they sell both
jewlery making and machining supplies. They might have an idea? I
have always used oil stones to polish the edges of my gravers but
his method, under the scope with a wheel, seemed like a great idea
and sort of a natural way to do it.

Mark


#13

Hi Chris

Do you know anyone in that school? I see quite a long list of folks
to call, not wanting to call someone who can’t assist me. I’m
actually very interested in meeting with them. I’m off to Grand
Haven, (near Muskegan) MI in May. maybe I could go these as well. if
the pay is worth my 12 hours (one way drive)…plus motels.

-I use only Norton, Emery & Polishing papers-, I’ll find out exactly
what grit they are on Wednesday. I do a 2x week trip to our jewellery
center, here in Toronto. keep warm, eh!

Gerry


#14
Do you have any idea what type of wheel he is using to polish up
all those gravers? 
Funny you should say that, that is EXACTLY what I was wondering
Chris! My silicon wheels are all too soft, and I have dozens of
diferent ones.

Otto Frei carries a series of tools suggested or used by another
setter, “Jura”, a Russian fellow working and teaching in Amsterdam I
think. A specialist in micropave, he came up with a bunch of cool
tools/attachments for the GRS microball. anyway, he also suggests
Edenta diamond rubber wheels (and a diamond sintered disk), and Otto
Frei sells them. They’re hard and stiff for a silicone wheel, but not
totally immune to wearing down. High concentration of diamond, they
cut really fast, and will nicely and quickly polish a carbide
graver.

Costly. Like 35-40 dollars per mounted wheel. I should mention that
someone I know who actually went there, bought his tool set ($$$),
and spent a couple weeks (?) studying with him, mentioned that
although Jura specifies those rubber wheels, he doesn’t actually use
them much, though that’s “hearsay” from this one man (who’s also a
fantastic setter). Found that out after I bought a set…

Don’t know what he actually uses. But since he specifies them, they
must work reasonably well. I’m not unhappy with them, despite the
price.

HTH
Peter


#15

Hi all. The wheels being used to polish the gravers are called
Ceragloss. You can get them from Otto Frei (under Jura stone setting)
for $42 each. The least expensive that I have been able to find them
is $38.50 each at Pearsonlab.com and come in several shapes and sizes
along with a coarser green colored wheel, though I only have the blue
and yellow. They leave an incredible polish on gravers, are easy to
use and last a long time if used correctly. Expensive but worth the
money. Hope this helps. Keep on trying new things!


#16

Mark,

Check out the GRS website. I think I saw flex shaft wheels for what
we are talking about. I think they are impregnated with diamond. The
price reflects this.

Let me know if you try them out.
Chris


#17

Gerry,

Let me call the school this week and see who you would speak to.

Regards.
Chris


#18

Tim and I are old school. We sharpen our gravers by hand on a
sharpening stone. Then an Arkansas stone. After that we do a final
polish on a piece of Crocus paper taped to a flat surface. Lastly we
give the graver tip a little shove into the wooden bench pin to take
any burr off.

Have fun and make lots of jewelry.
Jo Haemer
timothywgreen.com


#19

Thanks for the tip on the Ceragloss wheels at Otto Frei Peter and
Paul! I actually have the Jura master stone setting set for the mini
ball and use it daily. There are a couple of the attachments I
seldom use and one that I modified, but for the most part I love it.
It was expensive but has paid for itself in time saved plus it’s
simply an improvement over how I was holding work. One weird thing
was that it doesn’t come in a box or anything, it’s just a bunch of
loose attachments. I made a box with compartments for one of my
bench drawers, that makes it easier to organize and quicker to use.
Thanks again for the tip on the wheels, I’ll be ordering soon! Mark


#20
Funny you should say that, that is EXACTLY what I was wondering
Chris! My silicon wheels are all too soft, and I have dozens of
diferent ones. I always work under my scope and tried a few
different wheels the other day on a graver, I need a harder
material wheel but one that will leave a bright finish on steel.

There are a couple wheels for platinum from stuller that are hard
enough to polish steel like that. One is yellow one is Grey. To get
the shape before polishing I use a diamond wheel under the microscope
which is a cheat from the way the pro’s do it but you can get
professional results if you are good with a flex shaft. It looks like
what that guy was doing also. One quick drag on charged leather or
paper gives that final mirror polish. The Polish wheels are the
bigger diameter 7/8ths or 1 inch