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Parameters for wine corking materials?


#1

Hi.

Do any wine drinkers know the parameters for corking materials? Will
lab grade black rubber stoppers affect the quality of the wine in a
bottle (assuming that the “cork” keeps the air out…).

How about neoprene o rings?

How about metals? I assume that non patinated sterling would be okay
and that bronze, copper or brass would be problematic…

Andy info would be apprciated.
Thanks, Andy


#2

As a winemaker in a former life…

The black rubber will work ok, unless it’s long term storage (I
assume you’re making bottle stoppers), as will neoprene type O-ring
material.

Metals to avoid (in order from AVOID to avoid) are iron, brass,
bronze, copper, silver, pewter. This is for non-immersed contact, for
immersed contact go with glass and plastics or noble metals (silver
is ok for short periods, as it reacts with the sulphites used in wine
preservatives).

Hope this helps you some.

Cheers, Thomas Janstrom.
Little Gems.
http://tjlittlegems.com


#3
Do any wine drinkers know the parameters for corking materials?
Will lab grade black rubber stoppers affect the quality of the wine
in a bottle (assuming that the "cork" keeps the air out....). 

Cork is used to allow wine to breeze. Without cork, aging of wines
would not be possible. There is a synthetic cork material on the
market now, but so far it has been only used in inexpensive wines
which are sold ready to drink. Everything else will affect quality of
the wine.

Leonid Surpin
www.studioarete.com


#4

Andy, there is a stopper for wine bottles made of what looks to be a
form of rubber. It has a one way valve and comes with a hand pump
which allows one to exhaust the air from the bottle. It works well.
For my part, I never have an open bottle more than a couple of days
before it is empty.

It would seem metals, if not coming into contact with the wine as it
should not, would not be a problem.

For general info, the latest solution is to replace air in the bottle
with nitrogen to prevent oxidation.

A votre sante
KPK


#5

Andy -

Silver is okay for wine, bronze, copper or brass would be a definite
no no as the acids in the wine can cause dangerous leaching in those
metals. As for corking, rubber is out. At the very least it could
flavor the wine, at worst it could degrade completely over time.
Preferred corking methods are plastic lined screwtop, plastic and
cork composite and plain old cork. Can’t speak to the neoprene
though.

Wendy


#6

Hi Andy,

I have seen cone stoppers with metal reaching well into the bottle.
These are usually made from stainless steel, sometimes silver plated

  • w/ a rubber sleeve to keep air out. They definitely use food grade
    neoprene O rings. I’m not sure about the lab grade rubber. People
    make such a fuss about “inert” materials- Here is a link to an
    article about materials used in bottling:

A number of wineries bottle with synthetic corks. A good one is
Neocork. It’s a dense foam covered with a thin smooth skin. They seem
to be quite durable. Trader Joe’s and some other grocers sell them
retail (unfortunately “Neocork” is printed across them). But if you
contact the distributor you can get plain ones in any color you want
(ask for samples).

http://www.neocork.com

I have found these really useful in jewelry making, too!


#7
The black rubber will work ok, unless it's long term storage (I
assume you're making bottle stoppers), 

As I recall it was Andy who asked this originally… I don’t know how
far you need to go as far as making the whole thing - there are kits
that you can buy for wine stoppers (which is what you want - a wine
stopper). We were given one at a party lately. Here’s one source:

http://woodenpost.com/products/bottle_stops_corkscrews.htm

Another with about the same stuff:

http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyid=4773

Googled for “wine stopper kit”. Of course you could use the design
of them and make your own, too.

http://www.donivanandmaggiora.com


#8
Cork is used to allow wine to breeze. 

I assume you mean breathe; and I think you’re mistaken. If air
reaches
the wine it causes oxidation - not good.

Without cork, aging of wines would not be possible. 

I think you’re mistaken on this point also. Would you care to explain
your reasoning behind this statement.

Always open to new
KPK