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Oxidation resist on silver


#1

When using liver of sulfur, black magic, or other oxidizers, it’s
sometimes difficult to “paint” it only on the area that I want
oxidized. Is there a “resist” type product to paint onto the
adjacent area that is easy to remove later without disturbing the
blackened area?

Thanks,
Jamie


#2

Try using Future Floor Finish. It is an acrylic. It being used by
some printmakers. It is easy to strip with just household ammonia.
see :

http://www.arts-in-company.com/print/intaglio/future.html

I have posted on this material on Orchid in the last 2? years. Check
the archives.

jesse


#3

I use masking fluid used for watercolor painting, you can buy it
from art suppliers. Simply paint it on the areas you don’t want
oxidizing and let it dry, then peel it off after you’ve finished
oxidizing.

Mandy


#4

Hi,

One of my students recently had success using liquid paper/wite out
to block off the area that she did not want to patina.

Cynthia Eid
http://www.cynthiaeid.com


#5

Use microshield and take it off with some acetone.

Russ Hyder
www.thejewelrycadinstitute.com


#6

Jamie

I use nail polish or a sharpie both work great it just depends on the
size of the area you want to resist. they come off with nail polish
remover and don’t effect the patina

regards
Robin


#7

Jamie, a little baby oil or WD40 will usually work but this can
sometimes be hard to keep where you want it. The solution will
typically run up on top of the oil. The very best thing I have found
is some melted wax… BUT if its in a high detail area it can be hard
to remove. Fingernail polish works well too…but again can be tough
to get off.

Good Luck. Dan.
DeArmond Tool


http://www.dearmondtool.com


#8

Someone else once suggested using rubber cement on the areas you
don’t want patina’d. Other types of resist that will work are paint
pens, acrylic paint, beeswax (melted), crayon (melted), and more.
Yeah, liquid paper will work too. Really, anything that you can find
at hand that can be applied with a brush and removed with hot water
or a minimum of effort will work. “Resist” is just the word used to
describe the action in which two materials or media repeal each other
either chemically or physically. Anything that will act as a barrier
between the silver and the LOS will work.

Michele
MikiCat Designs
http://www.mikicatdesigns.com


#9

Sean…See you guys tomorrow then. Re the business cards…I just
have not been able to get my programs to work. I used to use
Publisher but the new puter does not have Publisher in it…not even
Office Publisher!!! Don’t see the need to spend $150 to get that
program. In any event, I can’t read any of my old publisher
documents. Soooo…suggest your and Steve make the trek to local
Office Depot, etc and get some cards made. I will send you the logo
that we have been using for years on end tho.

Cheers,
Don.


#10

I just used rubber cement (think I read about it on this site) and it
worked reasonable well on a small (1 5/8 x 7/8 x 3 inches) sterling
lidded box. Things came out reasonably well. I didn’t need, or try to
get perfect coverage because I had simple flat planes to clean up. I
put it on thickly and it rubbed off easily. I did get some very
interesting small random spotting or dots in a few places which were
to remain un-patinated and were easily cleaned up. I don’t think
could have been achieved any other way and will experiment with it.

Try a second coat after the 1st dries. Don’t know if this is
possible. Or, cement on some paper if the work permits.

Dennis


#11

Use a magic marker for resist. None of that glue mess and it works
beautifully.


#12

Hello Jamie,

The problem you run into with using a “resist” type product to
protect areas you don’t want to patina is that when you remove the
resist, you also can damage the patina you so carefully applied. IF
the areas you want to protect are large enough & flat enough, you
can try to use just plain old clear packaging tape, and when it pulls
off it tends to come of whole, but if working with a really 3
dimensional piece that has lots of small intricate parts, that does
not help you. I have also just used plain old candle wax, or
Johnsons, Renaissance Wax, paste wax, etc. to areas I don’t want to
patina, and that helps somewhat as well to protect and seal the area
in question.

I don’t know about others, but I usually just use the tried & true
"paint the patina on the surfaces I want to patina" method for
delicate work. If there are other solutions out there, I will also be
interested in reading them.

Cheers!
Teresa