Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

Oxidation of copper


#1
 I always believed that this type of is very important
for metalsmiths to learn. Learning technique is great, but you
also need to know the physics behind the techniques to really make
them useful. 

Couldn’t agree more Doug. I’d like to see basic metallurgy,
analytical chemistry and physics taught to metal-smithing students.
As it is now it’s possible to emerge from an Australian University or
other tertiary teaching institution with a Degree or Diploma in
Goldsmithing and know squat about any of those disciplines, with
predictable results!

Al Heywood


#2

good grief! two postings in one night…Diamond Setting is a
amalgamation of physics,too! fulcrum for pliers, pressure tactics,
dispersing of heat, stress points on metal, crystals of a diamond,
angles for using a H.S.S. 90 angled drill as a file, pressure points
in gold. relieving internal stress…should I continue? how about
stress on a diamond or genuine stone? When I teach my class-mates in
stone setting in America or in my community college class. I always
let them know that “physics” takes and active role in this “Art”!!!


#3
       Couldn't agree more Doug. I'd like to see basic metallurgy,
analytical chemistry and physics taught to metal-smithing students.
As it is now it's possible to emerge from an Australian University
or other tertiary teaching institution with a Degree or Diploma in
Goldsmithing and know squat about any of those disciplines, with
predictable results! <g> 

All of which suggests that proper courses in goldsmithing/jewelry
work will perhaps want to suggest to their students as a textbook,
the new english translation of Brepohl’s “The Theory and Practice of
Goldsmithing” The whole first part of the book is perhaps the single
most concise and complete discussion of metalurgy for jewelers that
I’m aware of. While there is more info out there to be learned, it’s
widely distributed in bits and pieces, and often not specifically
aimed at the precious metal worker. Brepohl’s work, long available
only in German, and later in Russian, according to the books
preface, is now, thanks to Charles Lewton-Brain’s exceptional
translating effort, with the able editing work of Tim McCreight,
available to those of us speaking english. I’ve only just started to
leaf through it, but from that brief review, (and ignoring the
occasional minor typo that’s still there, Charles, in this newest
edition) I have to say this is an IMPORTANT book. All of you gentle
readers need to start budgeting for this thing… Its worth every
penny.

Peter