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Orchidians in Madison


#1

Hi,

I’m not from Madison but from Northern IL. I have taken a workshop
with Fred Fenster and am one of the founders of the Great Lakes
Enameling Guild that meets at Mt. Mary College in Milwaukee. I know
we have several members from Madison.

Karen


#2
   I'm not from Madison but from Northern IL. I have taken a
workshop with Fred Fenster and am one of the founders of the Great
Lakes Enameling Guild that meets at Mt. Mary College in Milwaukee.
I know we have several members from Madison 

And then there are also, I’d bet, a bunch of orchidians who are no
longer in Madison, but studied there, or grew up there. I got my
start in Madison, in Evelyn Bauman’s West High jewelery class as a
high school junior and then again my senior year, back in 68-70, as
well as working part time for Burnies rock shop. Then, it was up on
Monroe street, west of the stadium, partway up the hill, instead of
it’s current east side location. There’s a bank building there
now… From there I discovered the metals department (It had never
occured to me one could study jewelery making in college) when a
beginning drawing course I took as a lark, and as an elective my
sophomore year, happened to be taught by Arthur Vierthaler. Anyone
else here remember him? From there I found Fred 46enster’s class,
and I was hooked… Nowadays I only get back to Madison rarely,
since though my mom still lives there, most holidays she comes to
visit one or another of her kids, rather than us all going back
there. Last time I was there was shortly before my dad died a few
years ago… But when I’m there, I still usually manage to go say
high to Burnie, if he’s around, and marvel at how much my old town
has changed, as well as how much has remained the same…

Peter Rowe


#3

I am originally from Racine WI, but I studied with Fred Fenster as
an undergraduate in Madison. Incidentally, I started in high school
with a teacher who had studied under Fred Fenster as well. Then,
after moving to New York, I worked for some more Fred students. I
also met my husband in the metals studio at Madison. He is a
painter and wastaking some of Fred’s classes for fun. Madison
certainly was an important place in my life personally and
professionally.

After being used to Burnie’s rock shop, I was certainly overwhelmed
the first time I went to Metalliferous!

Natasha Wozniak


#4
After being used to Burnie's rock shop, I was certainly
overwhelmed the first time I went to Metalliferous!

Burnies can be deceptive, or at least, it used to be that way. The
tools and equipment is about what you expect. Standard catalog fare
for mostly the hobbyists, a bit more for the lapidary stuff, but not
a serious jewelery supply. And the cut gems vary a good deal, ranging
from standard fare to the occasional really unusual item. But
underneath it all, beneath the expected flashy kitch and stuff, is
the heart of a true rockhound: Burnie. Many of the real “gems”,
and what sets Burnies quite apart from some other rock shops, or
Metaliferous, are in the bins of slabs and rough. It helps to know
what you’re looking for. Some of that stuff has been there for 30
years, under appreciated, or unrecongnized by most of the students
and hobbyists who go in there, and in some cases, rare agates and
jaspers that are normally totally unavailable now, from sources long
ago played out. There’s not all that much of this sort of stuff,
but it’s there, if you look. Don’t under rate Burnies. Yeah, to
make the business run, they’ve got to cater to all the types who want
the common flashy stuff, as well as the students who need the cheaper
basics, and thats fine. But there are some real finds to be had if
you take the time. Or at least I saw stuff of that description only
a few short years ago. Some of it I recongized as having been still
there from when I worked there the summer of 1970…

Peter