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Old Swest Vulcanizer repair


#1

We have an old Swest vulcanizer (model 5314) that just won’t get up
to temperature anymore. Can anyone advise me on whether I should fix
or junk it? and how to go about fixing it if that’s a reasonable
thing to do?

I really hate sending stuff to the landfill if it’s still
serviceable. Advice on fixing it – where to get the parts & how to
do it – would be hugely appreciated.

Carey Holman
Lucky Dog Studios


#2

First of all, you need to take it apart. Look at the wiring, and
look at the rheostat (the temperature control). Glued to the inside
of the platens are two silicone heating pads - they are usually red,
and look like a bandage or something with two wires sticking out.
Most likely your problem is the temp. control or the heating pads, or
both. You can get both parts as a spare part - the pads just need to
be the same size, and the rheostat should be a reasonable match for
the original. Scrape off the old pads down to bare metal, and glue
the new ones on with silicone cement - it’s the only thing that can
stand the heat, and make sure it mentions, “Heat resistant” somewhere
on the tube. Changet the rheostat too, if you’re going to, and you
might think about new wiring, if the old stuff looks bad. It is most
important that you use heat resistant wiring, of the sort used in
toasters and such, if you do change it. It’s really quite a simple
mechanism, and if you change out the guts, it should work like
new…


#3

Carey

We have an old Swest vulcanizer (model 5314) that just won't get up
to temperature anymore. Can anyone advise me on whether I should
fix or junk it? and how to go about fixing it if that's a
reasonable thing to do?

Should be easy fix. We have most of the guts available in our work
shop.

We built a similar one for two years. Can sell you the heating
elements etc if you need them.

Kenneth Singh
46 Jewelry Supply,
manufacturers of Karat Jewelers Equipment.


#4

Carey,

At IJS, we stock many parts for vulcanizers. Brands we have stocked
include Romanoff, Kerr, and PEPE. Perhaps an appliance repairman can
bench-test the heating element and controllers, to tell you exactly
where the thing has gone awry. Perhapser, there are common parts
among the various brands.

In the near term, you can handle your moldmaking needs with a few
giant C-clamps, your home oven, and tolerant
spouses/children/roommates.

If a new vulcanizer is the cheapest route to go, your old vulcanizer
is still a serviceable screw press for pancake dies, light metal
forming, relief printing, wine grapes, leaves and flowers. A
photographer might want it as a prop to express “putting the squeeze
on” something.

Dan