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Non-Tarnish Stg Sil Query


#1

A supplier here in New Zealand (Golden West) advertises a
non-tarnish stg silver. They say this about it:

-resists tarnish
-brighter finish
-easier to work
-hardness 58 HV
-melts 830C-895C (1526F-1643F)

As they don’t disclose what’s in it, does anyone here have any
clues as to what’s in the remaining 7.5%? Maybe tin is the alloying
component, but I don’t think the sil/tin phase diagram goes up to
these temps at any point.

Brian
B r i a n � A d a m J e w e l l e r y E y e w e a r �
@Brian_Adam1 ph/fx +64 9 817 6816 NEW ZEALAND
http://www.adam.co.nz


#2

Its my understanding its silica that is used as the aloy. I’ve been
using it for 5 years now and it’s great for most things. Its softer
then regular sterling silver. I have a piece sitting on my desk
thats 4 years old and it hasn’t tarnished yet!! In the states it’s
known as de-ox silver alloy. Vernon


#3

Hi Brian, Here in the states we have a law that states that a
maufacturer of a compound (including metal alloys) must present
upon request an MSDS form (Material Safety Data Sheet) and it
includes all the constituants of the compound or alloy (maybe not
the percentages of each) This allows folks the knowledge to take
proper safety precautions. These alloys are protected by
copyrights but at least you know whats there. J.A.


#4

Hi Brian,

It doesn’t appear anyone else has responded yet…

I have used a sterling casting grain available in the U.S. that is
said to be tarnish resistant. At least part of the copper alloy
has been substituted with silicon. It cast just fine, and to my
surprise, “oxidized” pretty well with liver of sulfur. Polished
well, too! The castings also came out of the investment much
cleaner (whiter) than I was used to. I couldn’t swear to the
long-term resistance to tarnish… I’m not even certain which
items still in my inventory were cast with it.

Hope this helps,

Dave
Dave Sebaste
Sebaste Studio
Charlotte, NC (USA)
dave@sebaste.com
http://www.sebaste.com


#5
    Its my understanding its silica that is used as the aloy.
I've been using it for 5 years now and it's great for most
things. Its softer then regular sterling silver. I have a piece
sitting on my desk thats 4 years old and it hasn't tarnished
yet!! In the states it's known as de-ox silver alloy. 

G’day; yet another two pennorth. I would imagine the alloying
substance used is the element SILICON, not it’s oxide silica SiO2
which is sand.

   /\
 / /

/ /
/ /___| \ @John_Burgess2
(______ )
At sunny Nelson NZ only not so sunny today for a change


#6

John, John, John…

You just don’t comprehend American “English.” I live near
Hollywood, the place where certain female exotic dancers have er…
“upper torso”… enlargements with “silica.” And to the north is
"Silicone" Valley, where they make all the transistors. Silicon?
Isn’t that the stuff lapidaries use as an abrasive extender fluid
in glyptic work?

Rick Martin In stunningly beautiful Ventura County, CA where the
glads and Peruvian lilies are in full bloom today!


#7

Thanks to all who responded. I read and appreciate it all. I will
attempt to get the MSDS from the suppliers here.

I’ve actually cast in 950 sil using a decent wollop of silicon in
the mix to get the detail:
http://www.adam.co.nz/eyewear/artworks/ferns.htm it’s a lost-fern
casting. I tried one mix with nearly 2% silicon and it was
somewhat brittle. I guess I overdid it!

Brian
B r i a n � A d a m J e w e l l e r y E y e w e a r �
@Brian_Adam1 ph/fx +64 9 817 6816 NEW ZEALAND
Where there are a disproportionate number of Mills & Boon writers

http://www.adam.co.nz


#8
    You just don't comprehend American "English."  

[snip]

... enlargements with "silica."  

Ha ha.

Do you know the best way to remember the difference between
silicon and silicone?

Brian
B r i a n � A d a m J e w e l l e r y E y e w e a r �
@Brian_Adam1 ph/fx +64 9 817 6816 NEW ZEALAND
http://www.adam.co.nz/eyewear/
http://www.adam.co.nz/crit.htm work in progress